MIT Computational Biology Group - Our research in the news

Spotlight:

Videos

HHMI interview (2002)
Matt's thesis defense (2010)
CRG symposium (2010)

Google News Archive

  • Click on the above link to search a timeline of news stories for our group
  • Note: Because some news stories move and links eventually fail, exceprts of the stories are linked with an asterisk below.

Epigenomics

  • PhysorgEpigenomics (*) - Epigenomics approach illuminates the dark corners of the genome
  • BroadInstChromStates (*) - Epigenomics approach illuminates the dark corners of the genome

    12 Drosophila genomes - Fly comparative genomics

  • Broad12Flies (*) - Genomic revelations from fly's family tree
  • GenomeResearch12Flies (*) - 12 Flies Press Release
  • Xinhuanet12Flies (*) - Scientists compare 12 fruit fly genomes
  • ScienceCentric12Flies (*) - Scientists complete DNA sequencing and analysis of multiple fruit fly genomes
  • EurekAlert12Flies (*) - Fly consortium uncovers swarm of novel findings about genomic evolution, function
  • Telegraph12Flies (*) - Fruit fly genome provides evolutionary insight
  • Scientist12Flies (*) - Surprises in fly genome
  • AFP12Flies (*) - Making a buzz: Gene study on fruitflies sheds light on evolution
  • TechnologyReview12Flies (*) - A novel approach to DNA analysis
  • ARStechnica12Flies (*) - A fruity dozen: sequencing effort nets many fly genomes
  • 12FliesScience (*) - Fruit Fly Blitz Shows the Power of Comparative Genomics
  • UNM_Network (*) - UNM Graduate Student is Co-author of Paper in Nature
  • Harvard12Flies (*) - Genome Analysis of Twelve Drosophila Species
  • EECS12Flies (*) - Kellis, MIT team announce significant findings in fly genome studies.
  • CSAIL12Flies (*) - Computational comparison of multiple Drosophila genomes proves to be a powerful research tool.
  • ScienceDaily12Flies (*) - Massive Project Reveals Shortcomings Of Modern Genome Analysis
  • HarvardGazette12Flies (*) - Decoding effort reveal fly species' DNA

    General Interviews

  • TR35 (*) - Technology Review Top Young Innovators
  • Ta Nea (*) - Greek Newspaper Interview
  • MOS (*) - Museum of Science Award
  • AdmissionsBlog (*) - Combining computer science with biology (Mellis)
  • Masshightech (*) - Innovator is well-suited to the language of MIT.
  • OpenDoor (*) - CSBi Open|DOOR Interview (Nov 2003)
  • TuftsLecture (*) - Tufts Academic Technology First Lecture
  • MuseumOfSciencePress (*) - Three Young Innovators to Watch

    microRNAs

  • GenomeResearchMicroRNAs (*) - Expanding Universe of microRNAs
  • AntiSense (*) - Making Sense of Anti-Sense MicroRNAs
  • microRNAtwist (*) - MIT reports new twist in microRNA biology

    Regulatory Motifs - Human / Yeast

  • Human Motifs (*) - Regulatory motifs in the human
  • Broad news - Regulatory Code of a Eukaryotic genome
  • GenomeResearchProteins (*) - Revisiting D. melanogaster
  • Human Genes (*) - Human gene count tumbles again

    Yeast Whole-Genome Duplication

  • BioITDuplication (*) - BioIT news
  • GenomeNewsNetworkDuplication (*) - News story on Genome Duplication
  • NewsWireDuplication (*) - Yeast geneticists get a 2-for-1 deal
  • PressReleaseDuplication (*) - Study answers questions on ancestry of yeast genome
  • PlantGenomes (*) - Implications of genome duplication for plants
  • DailyNonpareilDuplication (*) - Yeast may rise from 11,000 gene ancestor
  • FishWGD (*) - Small fish yields big insights

    YeastReannotation

  • GenomeNewsNetworkReannotation (*) - Yeast Genome Revisited
  • GenomeBiologyReannotation (*) - Many yeasts win the vote
  • TheScientistReannotation (*) - Yeasts get the vote
  • NatureHighlightsReannotation (*) - Genomics: Beyond Comparison
  • NatureNewsViews (*) - Yeast Comparative Genomics
  • BioITtourDeForce (*) - Genomics tour de force
  • DiarioMedicoReannotation (*) - La comparacion de genomas de levadura identifica nuevos genes
  • BerlinerReannotation (*) - Berlin Times Article
  • PressReleaseReannotation (*) - Broad Institute Press Release

    Old News (back when i was Kamvysselis)

  • HHMIinterview (*) - Howard Hughes Medical Institute
  • ParisKanellakis (*) - First recipient of Paris Kanellakis Fellowship
  • SprowlsAward (*) - MIT EECS - 2003 Sprowls Doctoral Dissertation Award
  • TauBetaPi (*) - Tau Beta Pi Intercollegiate Design Competition
  • Ifair (*) - MIT International Celebration
  • EvolutionPurposeImplementation (*) - Implementation of exon/intron evolution
    
    Technology Review Top Young Innovators
    http://www.technologyreview.com/tr35/Profile.aspx?Cand=T&TRID=467
    
       Since 1999, the editors of Technology Review have honored the young
       innovators whose inventions and research we find most exciting;
       today that collection is the TR35, a list of technologists and
       scientists, all under the age of 35. Their work--spanning medicine,
       computing, communications, electronics, nanotechnology, and
       more--is changing our world.[...]
    
       Manolis Kellis develops algorithms and techniques for analyzing the
       entire genomes of different species, the better to understand those
       genomes. Kellis began his PhD work with little knowledge of
       biology: his undergraduate degree is in computer science. For his
       thesis, he compared the genomes of four yeast species to identify
       all the genes and regulatory sequences in one of them--a project
       hes glad no one told him was believed to be impossible.
    
       Comparing the genomes of multiple closely related species has
       proved to be a powerful new tool for finding genes and the
       sequences that regulate them, and for learning about how genomes
       evolve (see "Finding Evolution's Signatures").
    
       After validating his methods in yeast, Kellis has moved to the
       human genome, which he has so far compared with those of the mouse,
       rat, and dog. His work is providing an intimate understanding of
       the human genome that may give drug developers new points of entry
       in their attempts to combat viruses and other causes of disease.
    
    
    Museum of Science Award
    http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2004/museum-1117.html
    
       Though far from finished with their own work, three senior MIT
       researchers passed the torch to a new generation of scientists on
       Tuesday, Nov. 9 at the Museum of Science in Boston.
       
       For the past two years, the museum has named several young New England
       scientists as the "Next Generation" of revolutionary researchers whose
       work already has made a significant contribution to their field. This
       year, the three honorees all work in biotechnology at MIT.  [...]
       
       Professor Eric Lander, founding director of the Eli and Edythe
       L. Broad Institute, whose mission is to create tools for genomic
       medicine, make them broadly available and use them to propel the
       understanding and treatment of disease, called it "a good and new
       experience for me to be part of the old generation." In his
       introduction of Kellis, Lander said he was impressed with the young
       scientist's enthusiasm and insights, referring to Kellis as an
       "extraordinary ball of energy."
       
       Kellis proved Lander's point by speaking enthusiastically about his
       work. He called it "using evolution to inform genomics, and using
       genomics to understand evolution." Kellis, who earned his Ph.D. in
       computer science from MIT, has developed new computational paradigms
       to help decipher DNA signals, understand gene regulation and clarify
       the evolutionary mechanisms of genomes. He has applied these tools to
       the yeast and human genomes, to systematically study all genes and
       regulatory elements. His work also showed that the yeast genome arose
       by whole-genome duplication, and that a similar event shaped the early
       vertabrate evolution of several fish.
       
       Kellis' "never-ending smile and unabashed optimism has always
       impressed me," Lander said. "This is definitely our future."
    
    
    Combining computer science with biology
    http://www.mitadmissions.org/topics/pulse/faculty_at_mit/prof_manolis_kellis_combining_1.shtml
    
       University professors are often portrayed as self-absorbed
       individuals that are too busy plotting their next breakthrough to pay
       any attention to their undergraduate students. While I have never
       encountered such a professor at MIT, Manolis Kellis, Assistant
       Professor of Computer Science, definitely destroys this
       all-too-prevalent stereotype. Last week, Prof. Kellis was honored as
       one of Technology Review's Top 35 Innovators Under 35 for his
       pioneering research in comparative genomics. When I sat with him today
       and asked him what it was like to receive such a distinction, he
       seemed genuinely surprised that I had even heard the news and
       immediately attributed his achievements to his unbelievable colleagues
       and students. He spoke very openly about his passion for research,
       love for MIT, outlook for the future of genomics, and pressures of
       living up to the hype that awards generate.
       
       Kellis was born in Greece, but moved with his family to France and
       eventually arrived in the U.S. in 1993. Manolis, his sister, and his
       brother were all accepted to MIT within nine months of each other. He
       says that MIT was the only school he applied to, and for him it was
       the obvious choice. At MIT, he felt that the sky was the limit and he
       could do whatever he wanted to do. But since his acceptance, he admits
       that his path has been partly determined by a series of coincidences.
       
       He chose to study Computer Science because it was an interesting,
       broad major that could open doors to any area. Manolis got his first,
       and only, UROP by "total chance." As he was walking through a
       corridor, he saw a friend who was on his way to a job orientation for
       the World Wide Web Consortium, led by Tim Berners-Lee (father of the
       Web). It sounded interesting so he tagged along and got chosen for one
       of the positions. He wrote a programmable WebCrawler for his project,
       but more importantly, he got an early start, which attracted companies
       and led to better opportunities. Without that UROP, he says, he
       "probably wouldn't be sitting here today".
       
       Manolis's interest in biology, and genetics in particular, also
       appears to be serendipitous. One day, he ran into a friend who
       happened to be reading a biology book that he himself owned. That
       friend opened his eyes to biology and introduced him to Eric Lander,
       the driving force behind the Human Genome Project, who eventually
       became his thesis advisor. Manolis says that seeing the genomic data -
       the string of A, T, G, and C's - was like seeing himself in the
       mirror. He became fascinated by the "code that makes us work"
       and "could never look back."
       
       Manolis continued his studies at MIT by getting a Masters in
       Engineering (M. Eng) in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science,
       and then entered the field of comparative genomics for his Ph.D. while
       the field was still in its infancy. Comparative genomics basically
       compares the genomes of different organisms to figure out what in the
       genome is important and how organisms might have evolved. For example,
       if the same string of A, T, G, and C's appears in dogs, rats, and
       humans at about the same place, then chances are that this string
       codes for something important that is worth keeping around for
       millions of years. So, Manolis compared the first four eukaryotic
       genomes, which all belonged to yeast, using a novel process to find
       genes and other pieces of DNA that determine when a gene is
       expressed. His research has received numerous awards and has been
       published seven times in the prestigious journal, Nature, in the past
       3 years.
       
       Finally, Kellis accepted a faculty position at MIT because of the
       students, his love for academia, the sense of camaraderie, and the
       ability to be in the middle of everything. After all, he points out,
       where else can you teach at the #1 program in Computer Science,
       surrounded by some of the best biological and medical institutions in
       the world. He also gushes about his students, who he deems are "so
       brilliant." Kellis emphasizes that he has so much to learn from his
       students and loves the feeling that we are all sitting together at
       a round table, trying to understand science." In general, he finds
       MIT students to be intellectual, motivated, sincere, diverse, and down
       to earth. He also loves that he has always felt accepted by MIT
       professors and appreciates that he has been treated with the utmost
       respect since his freshman year.
       
       Few people have seen MIT from as many perspectives as Manolis
       Kellis: as an undergraduate, a graduate student, and a member of the
       faculty. I would also venture to say that few people understand what
       makes MIT unique as well as he does. He accredits the success of MIT
       to a group of people that are brilliant in their own ways but work
       together. The power of diversity is evidenced by the fact that a
       colony of genetically identical bacteria can be wiped out by a single
       antibiotic. In the same way, cloning is boring since the secret to
       survival lays in the mutations, the diversity. Kellis finally
       emphasized that in life there are no right answers, we must always be
       creative, grab opportunities when they appear, and accept that
       mistakes will happen.
       
    
    
    Innovator is well-suited to the language of MIT.
    http://www.masshightech.com/displayarticledetail.asp?art_id=67200&sec_id=42
    
       Kellis, now an assistant professor at MIT, recalls that the family
       was living in Greece when his father decided to move the family to
       France.  No one in the family could speak French. Indeed, none even
       knew where they were headed, which was a small city called Aix en
       Provence.
    
       "I had been at the head of my class in Greece, but suddenly I
       couldn't even speak the language of the school," said Kellis,
       27. "I did math with a dictionary, first translating the problem
       from French to Greek before I could work on the problem."  "Looking
       back, it was a great experience in having to adapt and acquire new
       skills. At the time it was tough."
    
       Kellis was honored recently in an event hosted by the Museum of
       Science. He was one of three young MIT professors declared "Young
       Innovators to Watch." Others honored were Chris Burge and Angelika
       Amon.
    
       Eric Lander, who heads the Broad Institute of genomic studies in
       Cambridge, introduced Kellis as one of the most promising
       researchers at the institute.  Lander lauded Kellis for his ability
       to integrate computational paradigms to the complex tasks of
       deciphering DNA signals, understanding gene regulation and
       clarifying how genes evolve.  Lander, founding director of the
       institute, said Kellis' work has the potential to help cure disease
       and also contribute to the understanding of natural history and
       evolution.
    
       The term "evolution" is a relevant one to Kellis, at least in terms
       of his education.  After four years in France, he matriculated to
       the Lycee Francais in New York, where he added English to his
       linguistic repertoire.  Never one to remain in one place, he
       enrolled at MIT. This decision was not as unexpected as some
       earlier ones: both his sister and brother were attending the
       Cambridge university.  "I chose MIT because it's the best," Kellis
       said. "And the experience has turned out to be a great one."  "What
       I love about the people - faculty and students - is the belief that
       nothing is impossible. People are always pushing the bounds of
       knowledge."
    
       After he received his undergraduate degree, he spent several years
       in San Francisco. He worked with Xerox PARC, a renowned research
       center for all things computer.  Kellis says he worked on
       computational geometry, modular robotics and human motion
       understanding.  Yet after several years there, he returned to
       Cambridge to seek his Ph.D. in bioinformatics.
    
       Like a good New Englander, he appears to have absorbed the credo
       that adversity, at least in terms of weather, can edify the man.
       Indeed, his web site contains the quote "Live in New York once, but
       leave it before it makes you hard. Live in California once, but
       leave before it makes you soft."  Now again entrenched in
       Cambridge, Kellis is affiliated with both the Broad Institute and
       MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory.
    
       Because bioinformatics is such a new field, he has the opportunity
       to become a pioneer as young scientists continue to add to the
       knowledge of the field.
    
       Though a career at MIT often results in professors leaving for
       high-tech startups, Kellis appears content to pursue his career in
       academia.  "I just started an assistant professorship, and my goal
       is research and academic life," he said.  "There might be
       consulting opportunities or business opportunities in the future,
       but at this point I am excited to be at an institution with so many
       possibilities for research."
    
       Finally, Kellis appears prepared to stay put.
    
    
    Genomic revelations from fly's family tree
    http://www.broad.mit.edu/cgi-bin/news/display_news.cgi?id=4083
    
      In one of the first large-scale comparisons of multiple animal
      genomes, scientists at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, the
      Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) at
      MIT, and many collaborating institutions, have analysed the genomes of
      twelve species of the fruit fly Drosophila to reveal insights on the
      evolution of genes and genomes and to discern the functional elements
      encoded in animal DNA. The work appears in the November 7 issue of
      Nature and in more than 40 accompanying papers in Genome Research and
      other journals. The method of comparing the genomes of multiple
      related species, fly or otherwise, not only reveals new insights into
      species evolution and identifies thousands of novel genes and other
      functional elements, but also provides a powerful tool for unravelling
      genome function that may help researchers unlock the secrets of our
      own genome.
      
      In these papers, the international consortium reported the genomes of
      ten newly sequenced Drosophila species, some very closely related and
      others less so, and their comparison to two previously sequenced flies
      including Drosophila melanogaster, one of the most powerful model
      organisms for the study of animal biology and evolution. The
      availability of the many Drosophila genomes has enabled a great deal
      of new insights about genome function and aided the study of how
      genomes have changed across evolutionary time.
      
      "Having the sequences of many closely related species allows us to
      study the evolutionary forces that have shaped the fruit fly's family
      tree, and to discover the working parts of the fly genome in a
      systematic way," said Manolis Kellis, associate member of the Broad
      Institute, assistant professor in MIT's CSAIL, and one of the
      consortium's project leaders.
      
      On one hand, the researchers studied the differences across species to
      help elucidate how evolution has shaped fly biology over millions of
      years. Their analysis revealed that while many attributes of
      Drosophila genomes are in fact conserved across multiple species, each
      species has novel features not seen in any other. In fact, only 77
      percent of the approximately 13,700 protein-coding genes in
      D. melanogaster are shared with all of the other 11 species. For
      example, the genes involved in interactions with the environment and
      in reproduction showed signs of adaptive evolution, meaning that they
      likely provided some survival advantage to the organism.
      
      On the other hand, the researchers studied the similarities of the
      different species to help define the functional parts of the fly
      genome. The parts of a genome that are unchanged (conserved) are those
      that have been kept by evolution, and are thus likely to play crucial
      roles. Thus, genome comparison can reveal which regions of the genome
      are functional, based on the degree to which evolution has conserved
      them.
      
      "Focusing on the conserved part of the genome is a great way to
      discover what has been maintained by evolution," said
      Kellis. "Moreover, by looking more closely at the subtle patterns of
      mutation within conserved regions, we can predict the functional roles
      they play."
      
      Indeed, at the level of DNA, several combinations of letters, or
      nucleotides, may encode the same function, in the way that a
      storyteller can use different combinations of words to tell the same
      tale. For example, four different nucleotide combinations - GTT, GTC,
      GTA, and GTG - all encode the same protein building block, or amino
      acid. Thus, a change in the third letter would leave the amino acid
      unchanged, one example of how DNA changes can be tolerated while still
      preserving the function of the corresponding protein.
      
      Through these kinds of random mutations, evolution explores the space
      of possible nucleotide combinations that preserve function. This
      exploration produces unique patterns of genomic change, described by
      the researchers as "evolutionary signatures" that are specific to the
      function of that region of DNA. Protein-coding genes, for example,
      show frequent substitutions at every third nucleotide, due to the fact
      that one amino acid can be encoded by several nucleotide triplets. In
      contrast, some genes that don't encode proteins - so-called RNA genes
      - show changes that preserve the overall structure of RNA while
      tolerating changes in the genes' DNA sequence.
      
      Like codebreakers turning their knowledge of biology into
      computational algorithms, Kellis and his colleagues identified
      evolutionary signatures associated with a variety of roles in the
      genome: protein-coding genes, non-coding RNAs, microRNAs, and
      regulatory motifs. In each case, the researchers identified distinct
      evolutionary signatures associated with each function, based on the
      tolerated changes that still preserve that function.
      
      The researchers then used these evolutionary signatures to
      systematically identify the functional elements encoded in the fly
      genome, leading to hundreds of novel functional elements and many new
      insights on animal biology.
      
      The work allowed the discovery of 1,193 new sequences that encode
      proteins, the flagging of 414 regions that were mistakenly labelled as
      protein-coding genes, and corrections to hundreds of previously
      annotated protein-coding genes. This allowed the researchers to revise
      the catalogue of protein-coding genes for Drosophila melanogaster,
      with updates affecting 10% of all genes. The revision was confirmed
      through manual curation by scientists at the FlyBase consortium and
      through large-scale experimental validation led by the Berkeley
      Drosophila Genome Project.
      
      In addition, the researchers identified hundreds of new RNA genes and
      structures, new microRNA genes, and new DNA sequences involved in the
      control of gene expression during embryo development and environmental
      changes. The twelve genomes also allowed the prediction of very small
      regulatory targets in the genome, which can help piece together the
      first regulatory network for an animal genome without having to
      perform intense and expensive experiments.
      
      The work also led to many surprises. For example, the researchers
      found many protein-coding genes that defy the traditional rules of how
      the DNA code gets translated into protein. For example, 150 genes
      apparently bypass signals that would normally cause DNA to stop being
      translated, and other genes encode multiple proteins in a single RNA
      transcript. Other findings include surprising evidence that a single
      microRNA gene locus can produce up to four functional microRNAs, each
      with distinct functions.
      
      The team's analysis is the first time that such a diverse range of
      evolutionary signatures has been applied to identify the functional
      elements of a genome in a comprehensive way. "By comparing many
      closely related genomes, we were able to discover things we never
      thought were possible using one genome sequence alone," said
      Kellis. One intriguing possibility is that evolutionary signatures may
      even identify novel, yet unknown classes of functions. For example,
      although the fruit fly has been intensely studied for over a century,
      microRNAs were only discovered in the last decade, and are now known
      to play a central role in development. Many other classes of yet
      unknown functional elements may be hidden in the fly genome, and
      recognition of their common evolutionary properties may help lead to
      their discovery.
      
      The study of the 12 flies has immediate implications for the discovery
      of functional elements in the human genome. "We are now using similar
      methods to analyse 32 mammalian genomes, in order to help understand
      the human genome," Kellis explained. "We should be able to apply the
      methodology of evolutionary signatures to any group of closely related
      species."
    
    
    Fly consortium uncovers swarm of novel findings about genomic evolution, function
    http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2007-11/nhgr-sct110507.php
    
      Scientists compare 12 fruit fly genomes Fly consortium uncovers swarm
      of novel findings about genomic evolution, function
      
      An international research consortium of scientists, supported by the
      National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), part of the National
      Institutes of Health (NIH), today announced publications comparing the
      genome sequences of 12 closely related fruit fly species, 10 of which
      were sequenced for the first time. The analyses identify thousands of
      novel genes and other functional elements in the insects' genomes, and
      describe how evolution has shaped the genomes of these important
      models for genetic research.
      
      "This remarkable scientific achievement underscores the value of
      sequencing and comparing many closely related species, especially
      those with great potential to enhance our understanding of fundamental
      biological processes," said Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D., director
      of NHGRI. "Thanks to the consortium's hard work, scientists around the
      world now have a rich new source of genomic data that can be mined in
      many different ways and applied to other important model systems as
      well as humans."
      
      The fruit fly is one of the most important model organisms in genetic
      research. In studies dating back nearly a century, researchers used
      fruit flies to discover the basic rules of inheritance and to study
      how a single cell, the fertilized egg, develops into a whole
      animal. Because fruit flies are easy to work with in laboratory
      settings, they continue to be used as a model to study fundamental
      biological processes that occur in many living things, including
      humans.
      
      Although fruit flies have a genome that is 25 times smaller than the
      human genome, many of the flies' genes correspond to those in humans
      and control the same biological functions. In recent years, fruit fly
      research has led to discoveries related to the influence of genes on
      diseases, animal development, population genetics, cell biology,
      neurobiology, behavior, physiology and evolution.
      
      In papers published in the journal Nature, the Drosophila Comparative
      Genome Sequencing and Analysis Consortium compare the genome sequences
      of Drosophila melanogaster, which was published in 2000, and
      D. pseudoobscura, published in 2005, with the recently sequenced
      genomes of D. sechellia, D. simulans, D. yakuba, D. erecta,
      D. ananassae, D. persimilis, D. willistoni, D. mojavensis, D. virilis
      and D. grimshawi. In addition, two companion manuscripts in today's
      Nature were contributed by researchers from the Laboratory of Cellular
      and Developmental Biology of the National Institute of Diabetes and
      Digestive and Kidney Diseases, at NIH.
      
      The work was carried out by hundreds of scientists from more than 100
      institutions in 16 countries. The sequencing of the 10 new genomes was
      led by Agencourt Bioscience Corp., Beverly, Mass. Other sequencing
      centers contributing to the sequencing were Washington University
      School of Medicine, St. Louis, Mo., the Broad Institute of MIT and
      Harvard, Cambridge, Mass., and the J. Craig Venter Institute,
      Rockville, Md. The sequencing centers were funded as part of NHGRI's
      Large-Scale Sequencing Research Network.
      
      To the average person, one fruit fly hovering around an overripe
      banana looks pretty much like any other. Researchers found that, at
      first glance, the genomes of the various types of fruit flies appear
      quite similar. However, a more detailed examination reveals that only
      77 percent of the approximately 13,700 protein-coding genes in
      D. melanogaster are shared with all of the other 11 species.
      
      Scientists observed that different regions of the fruit fly genomes,
      including protein-coding genes and gene families, are evolving at
      different rates. For example, genes involved in taste and smell,
      detoxification and metabolism, sex and reproduction, and immunity and
      defense appear to be the most rapidly evolving in the fruit fly
      genomes.
      
      The findings suggest that these particular protein-coding genes likely
      evolve in the fruit fly genome as a result of adaptation to changing
      environments and sexual selection. For instance, the fruit fly species
      D. sechellia, whose population lives on the Seychelles islands in the
      Indian Ocean, is losing gustatory (taste) receptors approximately five
      times faster than other fruit fly species that generally encounter a
      more diverse set of foods than those available on an island.
      
      In a surprising finding, researchers found that the genes that produce
      selenoproteins appear to be absent in the D. willistoni
      genome. Selenoproteins are responsible for reducing excess amounts of
      the mineral selenium, an antioxidant found in a variety of food
      sources. Selenoproteins are present in all animals, including
      humans. D. willistoni appears to be the first animal known to lack
      these proteins. However, researchers suggest that D. willistoni may
      possibly encode selenoproteins in a different way, opening a new
      avenue for further research.
      
      A project leader and co-author for the studies, William M. Gelbart,
      Ph.D., of Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass., said "The
      availability of the 12 fruit fly genomes resulted in a dramatic
      increase in resolution allowing us to examine how evolution has
      fine-tuned biological processes. Our work shows that discovery power
      increases with the number of genomes available for comparison."
      
      More than 40 companion manuscripts with further detailed analyses are
      in current and forthcoming issues of Bioinformatics, BioMed Central
      (BMC) Bioinformatics, BMC Evolution Biology, BMC Genomics, Genetics,
      Genome Biology, Genome Research, Journal of Insect Science, Molecular
      Biology and Evolution, Nature Genetics, Public Library of Science
      (PLoS) Genetics, PLoS One, Proceedings of the National Academy of
      Sciences, and Trends in Genetics.
      
      In addition to their analyses aimed at gaining a better understanding
      of genomic evolution, consortium scientists used the 12 fruit fly
      genomes to identify thousands of new genes and other functional
      elements. This work will bolster efforts to find all functional
      elements in the reference genome sequence of D. melanogaster.
      
      "Comparing the 12 fruit fly genomes allowed us to recognize
      evolutionary signatures characteristic of each function. These
      signatures enabled us to distinguish and identify thousands of new
      functional elements." said Manolis Kellis, Ph.D., of the Massachusetts
      Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Mass., and a co-author of the
      Nature papers.
      
      Specifically, researchers used the evolutionary signals to discover
      1,193 new protein-coding sequences and called into question 414
      sequences previously reported as protein-coding genes in the
      D. melanogaster genome sequence. In addition, they found hundreds of
      novel functional elements across the 12 fruit fly genomes, including:
      non-protein coding genes; regulatory elements involved in the control
      of gene transcription; and DNA sequences that mediate the structure
      and dynamics of chromosomes.
      
      "Our analyses only represent a small portion of questions that can be
      answered in the context of these 12 species," said Andrew G. Clark,
      Ph.D., from Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y., a co-author on the
      Nature papers. "Today's findings represent an important starting point
      for future research aimed at understanding the function of the genome
      features we discovered and their relevance to the human genome."
    
    
    Fruit fly genome provides evolutionary insight
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/main.jhtml?view=DETAILS&grid=&xml=/earth/2007/11/07/scifly107.xml
    
      Scientists have cracked the DNA code of a dozen different species of
      fruit fly, a tour de force that will lay bare new details of how
      evolution works.
      
      The study will shed light on human medicine too and has already
      revealed that earlier methods to find genes are flawed.
      
      The fruit fly is the world's favourite laboratory animal because many
      of their genes correspond to those in humans and control the same
      biological functions, a fact underlined how today's study was carried
      out by hundreds of scientists from over 100 institutions in 16
      countries.
      
      "The evolution of the fruit fly is interesting in itself as,
      basically, they have been following us around the planet as we discard
      rotting fruit - they started off in Africa with us - now are
      everywhere," said Dr Ewan Birney of The European Bioinformatics
      Institute, Cambridge, who comments on the work in Nature.
      
      "Now these fruit flies, who have been our evolutionary companion as we
      left Africa, repay us by giving insights into their genome. Flies can
      remember things, they can get drunk," he said, listing some of the
      ways they will help human medicine.
      
      "Their evolution is particular interesting, especially in Hawaii where
      there are these weird super-sized flies," he said, adding that he
      expected the work will pave the way for similar comparisons of
      mammalian genomes.
      
      More than 40 manuscripts related to these studies are forthcoming, in
      addition to the papers published today in the journal Nature.
      
      The studies reveal new details of how genes are regulated- turned on
      and off - which is important to understand how relatively few genes -
      around 14,000 and 20,000 respectively, - can build an organism as
      complex as a fruit fly or a human being.
      
      Genes are messages written in DNA that control the manufacture of the
      proteins the build and operates our bodies. Today's papers also reveal
      major flaws in the way scientists identify genes.
      
      They found 1,193 new DNA sequences that encode proteins, 414 regions
      that were mistakenly labelled as protein-coding genes, and made
      corrections to hundreds of stretches of DNA previously thought to be
      protein-coding genes. The resulting corrections will affect 10% of all
      fruit fly genes.
      
      The scientists also learned certain genes appear to be evolving faster
      than others, such as the genes associated with smell and taste, sex
      and reproduction, and defences against disease.
      
      "Having the sequences of many closely related species allows us to
      study the evolutionary forces that have shaped the fruit fly's family
      tree," said Manolis Kellis, associate member of the Broad Institute,
      near Boston.
      
      "This remarkable scientific achievement underscores the value of
      sequencing and comparing many closely-related species, especially
      those with great potential to enhance our understanding of fundamental
      biological processes," said Dr Francis Collins, director of the US
      National Human Genome Research Institute, Maryland.
      
      "Scientists around the world now have a rich new source of genomic
      data that can be mined in many different ways and applied to other
      important model systems as well as humans."
      
    
    Surprises in fly genome
    http://www.the-scientist.com/news/home/53844/
    
      Comparative genome sequencing of 12 Drosophila species reveals new
      genes, gene structures, and regulators
      
      Even after decades of genetic study, the Drosophila melanogaster
      genome still contains undiscovered genes and other genetic elements,
      according to a study in this week's Nature.
      
      By comparing evolutionary signatures in the genome sequences of 12
      Drosophila species, the authors found new protein-coding, RNA, and
      microRNA genes, as well as gene regulators and targets. They also
      discovered that several unusual translation mechanisms -- including
      skipped stop codons and reading-frame shifts -- are more common than
      previously thought.
      
      Accompanying research papers in Nature this week present an overview
      of Drosophila genome evolution, as well as new findings in Drosophila
      sex chromosomes and sex-biased gene expression.
      
      Finding new protein-coding genes in an organism as well-studied as
      D. melanogaster is "an interesting surprise," said Elliott Margulies
      of the National Human Genome Research Institute in Rockville, Md., who
      was not involved in the work.
      
      Scientists led by four researchers -- Alexander Stark, Michael Lin,
      and Pouya Keradpour of the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard in
      Cambridge, Mass., and Jakob Pedersen of the University of Copenhagen
      -- examined the 12 Drosophila sequences for evidence of regions that
      have been under natural selection. They scanned the genomes for unique
      evolutionary signatures associated with each type of genetic
      element. For example, conserved protein-coding regions usually show
      base changes that do not affect amino-acid sequence, while RNA genes
      allow mutations that preserve base-pairing interactions and microRNA
      genes show strong conservation only in certain parts of their
      sequences.
      
      This approach "kicks up a notch the kind of comparative genomics that
      you can do," Margulies said. While most previous comparative
      studiesonly allowed researchers to determine whether a given region
      went through selection, using these signatures identifies what type of
      element it likely is.
      
      The analysis predicted about 1,200 novel protein-coding exons in the
      Drosophila genome, corresponding to 150 new genes. Their results led
      to the revision of hundreds of gene transcription and translation
      models, which senior author Manolis Kellis of the Broad Institute said
      will be reflected in the next version of the annotated Drosophila
      genome at FlyBase.
      
      The authors found evidence of several unusual gene structures in the
      fly, such as stop-codon readthough, in which a stop codon is misread
      or skipped, and poly-cistronic genes, which code for two or more
      distinct proteins. They also found that the Drosophila genome contains
      several instances of "programmed" changes in the reading frame of
      translation, which alters how messenger RNA is read into protein. All
      of these discoveries were "really unexpected," Kellis told The
      Scientist. "Many protein-coding genes don't actually follow the rules
      you would expect them to follow."
      
      According to Ross Hardison of Pennsylvania State University in
      University Park, who was not involved in the work, these gene
      structures were thought to be very rare. "The importance of them
      becomes more obvious when you see multiple examples of them in a
      genome-wide study," he said.
      
      The comparative analyses uncovered new microRNA genes, RNA genes, and
      RNA structures involved in post-transcriptional processes such as
      messenger RNA editing and translational control. They also revealed
      many new gene regulators, including several found at higher levels in
      specific tissues than regulators already known to be important in
      these tissues.
      
      Their ability to add so much information to D. melanogaster annotated
      genome through comparative genomics shows "how powerful these methods
      are," Kellis said.
      
    
    Analyses Of 12 Fly Genomes Reveals New Insights On Genome Evolution And Regulation
    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/11/071107160224.htm
    
      Genome Research is publishing a number of papers related to
      comparative analyses of twelve Drosophila (fly) genomes. The twelve
      fly genome project is unique in that the analyses of closely related
      species has allowed for a more complete and correct annotation of
      functional genes and regulatory elements in Drosophila melanogaster,
      a major model organism in genetics.
    
      With a life span of just weeks, the fruit fly has been an important
      model organism in genetic studies for decades and has helped
      researchers unravel the rules that govern inheritance. Though there
      are many differences between fruit flies and humans, the two also
      share many genes that regulate the same biological functions.
    
    
    Expanding universe of microRNAs
    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/11/071107160224.htm
    
      MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short RNA molecules encoded by plant and
      animal genomes that have garnered significant interest for their
      ability to regulate gene expression. A number of miRNAs have been
      discovered in recent years, however it is likely that many miRNAs
      have gone undetected. Two papers published in Genome Research
      utilize the twelve fly genomes to identify novel miRNAs, further
      refine the set of known miRNAs, and investigate the biology and
      origins of miRNA genes.
    
      In a study led by Dr. David Bartel, a combination of computational
      methods and high-throughput sequencing techniques identified new
      miRNAs conserved across the Drosophila species. "The new fly genomes
      enabled us to predict new miRNAs, 20 of which we experimentally
      confirmed, and the genome alignments enabled us to more accurately
      predict the evolutionarily conserved targets of these and other
      miRNAs," explains Bartel.
    
      While computational methods are important for identifying novel
      miRNAs, large-scale sequencing of small RNAs indicates that many
      miRNAs continue to evade prediction. "Most of the 59 novel miRNAs
      that we found were not predicted by us or by others," describes
      Bartel. "This illustrates the advantages of high-throughput
      sequencing of small RNAs, and the limitations of comparative
      sequence analysis for miRNA gene identification."
    
      In a related paper, a study led by Dr. Manolis Kellis utilized the
      twelve Drosophila genomes to computationally predict and
      experimentally validate novel miRNAs by defining the structural and
      evolutionary properties of known miRNAs. Classification of newly
      identified miRNAs has revealed greater diversity in the regulation
      gene expression by miRNAs, with increased potential for
      combinatorial regulation, and provided new insights on miRNA
      biogenesis and function. "We learned that both arms of a miRNA
      hairpin can produce functional miRNAs, which sometimes work
      cooperatively to target a common pathway," explains Kellis.
    
      The combination of comparative and experimental analyses by both
      groups also provided novel evidence for emergent gene function,
      deriving from the portion of the miRNA hairpin previously believed
      to be discarded, and the strand of the DNA previously not thought to
      produce a miRNA.
    
    
    Revisiting D. melanogaster
    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/11/071107160224.htm
    
      Drosophila melanogaster is one of the most intensely studied model
      organisms in biology. Numerous studies over the years have defined
      nearly 14,000 protein-coding genes by experimental and computational
      methods, however these methods are likely to have produced erroneous
      annotations or may be missing other annotations. In order to assess
      the D. melanogaster protein-coding gene catalog, a group of
      researchers led by Dr. Manolis Kellis identified evolutionarily
      signatures of protein-coding genes by comparative analysis of the
      twelve fly genomes. This strategy was then applied to evaluation of
      the current catalog and identification of genes that have escaped
      annotation.
    
      The study led to the discovery of hundreds of new genes, refined
      existing genes, and concluded that greater than 10% of the
      protein-coding gene annotations requires refinement.
    
      Additionally, the work revealed abundant unusual gene
      structures. "We have learned that many brain-expressed proteins may
      be undergoing post-transcriptional changes by stop-codon
      read-through," explains Kellis. "We found 149 genes for which a
      conserved stop codon is followed by strong evidence of
      protein-coding selection for up to hundreds of amino acids,
      suggesting a new mechanism for post-transcriptional regulation in
      animal genomes." The researchers also report additional widespread
      evidence suggesting several diverse mechanisms of
      post-transcriptional regulation for protein-coding genes.
    
    
    Scientists compare 12 fruit fly genomes
    http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2007-11/08/content_7029878.htm
    
      WASHINGTON, Nov. 7 (Xinhua) -- An international research
      consortium of scientists announced on Wednesday their publications
      comparing the genome sequences of 12 closely related fruit fly
      species, 10 of which were sequenced for the first time.
    
      The analyses identify thousands of new genes and other functional
      elements in the insects' genomes, and describe how evolution has
      shaped the genomes of these important models for genetic research.
    
      The work was carried out by hundreds of scientists from more than
      100 institutions in 16 countries. In papers published in the
      journal Nature, the consortium compare the genome sequences of
      Drosophila melanogaster, which was published in 2000, and
      D. pseudoobscura, published in 2005, with the recently sequenced
      genomes of 10 fruit fly species.
    
      Researchers found that, at first glance, the genomes of the
      various types of fruit flies appear quite similar. However, a more
      detailed examination reveals that only 77 percent of the
      approximately 13,700 protein-coding genes in D. melanogaster are
      shared with all of the other 11 species.
    
      Scientists observed that different regions of the fruit fly
      genomes, including protein-coding genes and gene families, are
      evolving at different rates. For example, genes involved in taste
      and smell, detoxification and metabolism, sex and reproduction,
      and immunity and defense appear to be the most rapidly evolving in
      the fruit fly genomes.
    
      The findings suggest that these particular protein-coding genes
      likely evolve in the fruit fly genome as a result of adaptation to
      changing environments and sexual selection.
    
      "Scientists around the world now have a rich new source of genomic
      data that can be mined in many different ways and applied to other
      important model systems as well as humans," said Francis Collins,
      director of the U.S. National Human Genome Research Institute,
      which supported the project.
    
    
    Making a buzz: Gene study on fruitflies sheds light on evolution
    http://afp.google.com/article/ALeqM5iEWRTP0p6DJt8xGPrESLohY4vlDg
    
      Lab sleuths said they had laid bare the complete genetic code of a
      family of fruitflies, enabling the world's first comparison of the
      genomes of a dozen closely-related species.
      
      The achievement opens a window onto key evolutionary processes and may
      one day serve as a model for understanding why we humans and our
      nearest primate cousins are so close yet also so different, they
      believe.
      
      In studies to be published on Thursday in the British journal Nature,
      around 150 scientists around the globe added 10 fully-sequenced
      genomes of the fruitfly Drosophila to two that had already been
      decoded.
      
      They also began to mine the treasure trove of data, publishing
      analyses touching on two cornerstones of evolutionary theory -- the
      principles of positive and negative selection.
      
      Positive selection means genetic mutations that spread through a
      species because they provide an advantage in the struggle to
      survive. Negative selection means genetic characteristics that are
      forced out of a species because they are an encumbrance to survival.
      
      By looking across a broad family, researchers can spot a mutation that
      has been favoured as it confers an evolutionary advantage on a
      specific species -- such as a change in the immune system -- or a
      mutation that has been weeded out.
      
      They can also identify genetic code that has remained unchanged, or
      conserved, because of its enduring usefulness to the species.
      
      Histone proteins, which determine how DNA is packed inside cell
      nuclei, have barely changed over the 60 million years going back to
      the single common ancestor from which all the Drosophila species
      eventually emerged, the investigators found.
      
      "Once evolution figures how to make something like that work, it does
      not change easily," said David Rand of Brown University, whose
      laboratory worked on sequencing mitochondrial DNA from all 12 fruitfly
      genomes.
      
      Only 77 percent of the approximately 13,700 protein-coding genes are
      shared by all 12 species, the consortium says.
      
      The humble fruitfly, especially the main species, Drosophila
      melanogaster, has long been used to probe the biology of multicellular
      organisms.
      
      It is familiar to many as the barely visible objects of school-age
      experiments on the mechanics of heredity.
      
      Over the last decade, however, geneticists have gradually shunted the
      harmless flies aside in favor of worms and especially mice, which
      offer better models for studying the relationship between genes and
      human disease.
      
      But the newly sequenced "Drosophila Dozen," which range from the tiny
      D. simulans to the relatively giant D. grimshawi of Hawaii and the
      red-eyed D. yakuba of the African savannah, are sure to rekindle
      interest in the winged beasts.
      
      "The 12 Drosophila genomes give us an unprecedented opportunity to
      understand evolutionary adaptation right down at the genetic level,"
      said Brown researcher Kristi Montooth.
      
      "If we want to understand how the fly that lives on the savannah is
      different from the fly that lives in the desert, we can trace
      physiological differences back to specific genes."
      
    
    A novel approach to DNA analysis
    http://www.technologyreview.com/Biotech/19689/
    
      In a milestone for the emerging field of comparative genomics, an
      international team of scientists has carried out a comparative
      analysis of the genome sequences of 12 different species of fruit
      flies. Not only did the researchers uncover patterns in the way that
      genes evolve as species adapt to different environments, but they
      also developed a new way of identifying the functional elements of
      the genome--a discovery with potentially far-reaching consequences.
    
      For more than a hundred years, the fruit-fly species Drosophila
      melanogaster has been instrumental in the study of genetics,
      developmental biology, and animal behavior. Because a significant
      number of human genes have fruit-fly analogues, researchers have
      also used the insect to study many human diseases, including cancer,
      diabetes, and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's. In
      2000, scientists published the genome sequence for D. melanogaster;
      the sequence of a second fruit-fly species followed several years
      later.
    
      There are 1,500 species of fruit flies, however, and they vary in
      appearance, behavior, and habitat. To fully understand the fruit-fly
      genome and how it has evolved, a consortium of more than a hundred
      labs around the world sequenced an additional 10 species and
      compared all 12 sequences. The group details its findings in two
      reports published in the November 8 issue of Nature.
    
      "If you want to get a crystal-clear picture of how genes influence
      what an animal will look like, what it will eat, what behavior it
      will exhibit, this is a completely unparalleled resource for doing
      that," says Leslie Vosshall, a neurogeneticist at Rockefeller
      University, in New York.
    
      The researchers selected species from all over the world--from
      Africa, Asia, the Americas, and the Pacific Islands. Some species
      are widespread and feed on a range of foods, whereas others are more
      limited. For instance, one species lives only on the Seychelles
      islands off the east coast of Africa and eats only one kind of
      fruit.
    
      In one of the papers, a team led by Manolis Kellis, a computational
      biologist at MIT, compared the 12 sequences in order to identify all
      the functional elements in the fruit-fly genome. These include not
      only genes that code for proteins, but also sequences that help
      regulate gene expression by, for instance, encoding small RNA
      molecules that bind to other parts of the genome. To find these
      elements, researchers typically look for sequences that are common,
      and therefore highly conserved, among different genomes. "The basic
      premise of comparative genomics is that if something is conserved
      over millions of years in a dozen species, it's likely to do
      something useful," says Kellis.
    
      But Kellis and his colleagues were also seeking an alternative
      strategy. They figured that by looking only for sequences that have
      remained roughly the same, they would miss a large number of
      functional elements. For instance, protein-coding genes can undergo
      extensive changes and yet retain their critical functions.
    
      By looking at all 12 genomes, the team found that each type of
      functional element changes in characteristic ways over time, and
      those patterns of change serve as evolutionary signatures. For
      instance, a series of three-letter DNA sequences in which the first
      two letters are always conserved but the third one changes is likely
      to be a protein-coding gene, says Kellis. So the researchers
      designed computer algorithms to mine the sequence data and find the
      evolutionary signatures for each type of functional element. "This
      allowed us to find things that we would never have expected to find
      just by looking at a single genome," says Kellis.
    
      Kellis's team found thousands of previously unidentified functional
      elements, including 150 protein-coding genes and more than a hundred
      microRNA genes. (MicroRNAs are short segments of RNA that silence
      genes by binding to specific sites in the genome.) The researchers
      also found that some genes, during their translation into proteins,
      ignore certain instructions and, as a result, acquire bits of
      protein encoded by other genes. "This is an entirely new mechanism,"
      says Kellis, adding that his group has since found evidence of this
      mechanism in the human genome as well.
    
      The second Nature paper describes research led by Andrew Clark, a
      population geneticist at Cornell University, who looked at known
      genes to see how they vary from one species to another and how they
      evolve, acquiring new functions as species adapt to their changing
      environments. Genes involved in the immune system, for instance,
      appear to evolve more rapidly than genes in the rest of the
      genome. The same was true for genes that regulate insecticide
      resistance.
    
      Taste and smell receptor genes also undergo frequent changes. When
      the researchers compared species of flies that are generalists with
      those that have more specialized food preferences, they found that
      the specialists lose genes for different taste receptors at a much
      higher rate than the generalists do. "How you smell the world
      influences how you eat, and this will tell us an enormous amount
      about how genes that encode for smell and taste influence behavior,"
      says Vosshall.
    
      The studies of the 12 fruit-fly genomes will no doubt help
      scientists better understand the human genome, says Kellis. Not only
      do fruit flies and humans have so many genes in common, but now
      researchers have a systematic way of interpreting genomes that could
      lead to the discovery of entirely new kinds of functional elements,
      he says.
    
    
    A fruity dozen: sequencing effort nets many fly genomes
    http://origin.arstechnica.com/journals/science.ars/2007/11/07/afruity-dozen-sequencing-effort-nets-many-fly-genomes
    
      Normally, our reports focus on one or two papers that mark a major
      or intriguing scientific milestone. Today is an exceptionplay a huge
      role in evolution. In any species' lineage, nearly half the gene
      families will change in size. Somewhere in the genome, a family
      member will be gained or lost every 60,000 years. The specialist,
      sechellia, lost more than most, as its simplified lifestyle has
      allowed it to forgo many metabolic activities and defenses against
      toxins. In contrast to this rampant reuse of existing genes, new
      genes appeared rarely. The researchers detected only 44 new genes
      that were clearly not the result of horizontal gene transfer. Most
      of them were short, intron-free, and involved in sex and
      reproduction.
    
      The massive data set also gives us greater perspective on the rare
      and unusual. Many large, conserved protein coding regions have stop
      codes in the middle of them. The authors that identified them
      suggest that 123 are cases where a single transcript codes for more
      than one protein, something that was once thought to only happen in
      bacteria. Another 150 or so seem to have the stop codon edited out
      by enzymatic alteration of the RNA (common in some single-celled
      Eukaryotes, but not recognized to occur widely in animals).
    
      I'm only scratching the surface of a couple of the publications, but
      it seems that anyone interested in biology will find something
      compelling somewhere in the blizzard of publications coming out of
      these genomes. And get ready for something even bigger: a similar
      effort is already well underway to sequence an equivalent group of
      mammals.
    
    
    Scientists complete DNA sequencing and analysis of multiple fruit fly genomes
    http://www.sciencecentric.com/news/07110720.htm
    
      Copy of Broad Press Release
    
    
    Fruit Fly Blitz Shows the Power of Comparative Genomics
    http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/summary/318/5852/903
    
      A consortium of about 250 researchers have done a 12-way comparison
      to track the evolution of genes, regulatory regions, entire
      pathways, and cellular processes. Having these patterns in hand
      makes it easier to spot similar features in the genomes of other
      species, including humans, researchers report in more than 40
      research papers in the 8 November issue of Nature and in other
      journals.
    
      "This work has really increased the sophistication of what we can
      learn from comparative sequence analysis," says genomicist Elliott
      H. Margulies of the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI)
      in Bethesda, Maryland. As project co-leader Michael Eisen of
      Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California points out, the
      comparison "allows you to map where [genetic] changes occur along
      the tree, and that allows you to study the process of evolution, not
      just the product."
    
      Manolis Kellis of the Broad Institute in Cambridge, Massachusetts,
      led an assessment of how each type of gene or regulatory region
      changed--or didn't change--from one species to the next, revealing
      specific evolutionary patterns, or signatures. Kellis and others
      have incorporated those telltale patterns into software to look for
      the same patterns in other species to pinpoint each type of
      DNA. "This allows us to assign function" to some regions "through
      computation alone," says Margulies.
    
      Based on a common pattern of insertions, deletions, base usage, and
      substitutions, Kellis and his colleagues detected 192 undiscovered
      protein-coding genes as well as 150 that do not follow standard
      rules. Typically, proteincoding genes have a "stop" sequence that
      signals the end of the gene. But in these 150 cases, protein-coding
      sequences extended beyond the "stop." "It's always a little humbling
      that the assumptions we are taught in school do not apply across all
      genes," says Ewan Birney of the EMBL European Bioinformatics
      Institute in Hinxton, U.K.
    
      With these new tools, which are particularly useful for recognizing
      regulatory DNA, Kellis and his colleagues have pieced together a
      fruit fly gene regulatory network that incorporates 81 microRNAs and
      67 transcription factors. "The methodology and principles are
      absolutely general, and they are applicable to any genome," says
      Kellis. Others say that the model still needs refining to reconcile
      it with experimental results. But geneticist Rama Singh of McMaster
      University in Hamilton, Canada, is quite pleased with this
      beginning. Because many fruit fly and human genes are equivalent,
      the network "is going to tell us a lot about humans," he predicts.
    
      The analysis bodes well for the utility of bird, marsupial, and
      reptile sequences in analyzing the human genome. It also argues for
      sequencing and comparing all the primates, says Birney: "The
      take-home message is that there are a lot of clear wins from doing
      this sort of evolutionary genomics."
    
    
    UNM Graduate Student is Co-author of Paper in Nature
    http://www.unm.edu/~market/cgi-bin/archives/002407.html
    
      UNM Graduate Student Sushmita Roy spent last summer at the
      Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the lab of Manolis Kellis,
      an assistant professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer
      Science. He specializes in developing computational algorithms for
      decoding the information present in the genomes of organisms.
    
      As part of her internship, Roy played a small part in a large
      project analyzing the genomes of 12 fly species. The paper
      describing the project and its results was released this week in the
      journal "Nature."
    
      In her summer project, she analyzed statistical properties of the
      fly regulatory network, computationally predicted by Kellis' lab,
      with nodes representing genes and edges representing regulatory
      control exercised by a "regulator" gene on a "regulate" gene.
    
      This led to the identification of network nodes with different types
      of connectivity. Nodes with high-connectivity were themselves
      regulators controlling important events in the growth and
      development of flies.
    
      Roy says the edges in the network also had non-random
      properties. Edges had a higher chance of existing between genes
      functioning in the same fly tissue, rather than in different
      tissues.
    
      The identification of these statistical properties helped the
      researchers to clarify the biological significance of the predicted
      regulatory network of developing flies, which can provide insight
      into important developmental events in higher organisms.
    
      The title of the journal article is "Discovery of Functional
      Elements in 12 Drosophila Genomes Using Evolutionary Signatures."
      Roy is listed as one of the co-authors on the article.
    
      Roy is working on her Ph.D. in Computer Science applying statistical
      algorithms to understand living systems. Her advisors, Assistant
      Professor of Computer Science Terran Lane and Professor of Biology
      Margaret Werner-Washburne are guiding her efforts to apply
      statistical algorithms to understand living systems.
    
      Her internship in the MIT summer program was sponsored by the
      Program in Interdisciplinary Biological and Biomedical Sciences
      (PIBBS) at UNM and (Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI)
      Interfaces program and was arranged by Bruce Birren, director of the
      Microbial Sequencing Center and co-director of the Genome Sequencing
      and Analysis program at the Broad Institute at the MIT and UNM
      Biology Professor Margaret Werner-Washburne.
    
    
    Genome Analysis of Twelve Drosophila Species
    http://www.mcb.harvard.edu/NewsEvents/News/Gelbart2.html
    
      On Thursday, November 8, there was a birth announcement that has
      been two years in the making: the initial publications on the
      comparative genome analysis of the entire DNA sequences of 12
      species of fruit fly (genus Drosophila). The announcement will
      include two main papers in Nature describing the community effort.
      One paper (Kellis et al.) focuses on the identification of
      evolutionary signatures for several different classes of functional
      elements within the Drosophila melanogaster genome.  The other
      (Drosophila 12 Genomes Consortium) focuses on understanding gene and
      genome evolution using whole genome datasets.  In addition,
      publication of these papers has been coordinated with the
      near-simultaneous publication of more than 40 companion papers in
      several different journals, notably Nature, GENETICS, Genome
      Research, PLoS, BMC, Molecular Biology & Evolution, Genome Biology
      and others.  This work comprises the research efforts of literally
      hundreds of scientists for the past 2-3 years.
    
      The Harvard MCB FlyBase group (Bill Gelbart, PI, Lynn Crosby, Bev
      Matthews, Andy Schroeder, Susan St. Pierre, Sian Gramates, Rob
      Kulathinal, Margo Roark, Ken Wiley, Jr., Kyl Myrick, Jerry Antone,
      AJ Bhutkar, Susan Russo and Peili Zhang) has been an integral part
      of the analysis coordination of these efforts.  Several members of
      this group are co-authors on the main papers, as well as three
      companion papers that are in press and two others that are still in
      preparation.  A number of surprising findings, only revealed through
      this kind of comparative genome analysis, were discovered.  "First,
      more than 100 genes are expressed in ways that violate typical
      genetic code dogma, such as stop codon readthrough and shifting of
      reading frame in the middle of a translated segment", says Dr. Bill
      Gelbart.  Secondly, "a species that, during its evolution, has
      dropped the use of selenocysteine (the so-called 21st amino acid)
      during translation (Drosophila willistoni)" was discovered.
    
      In addition to these findings, the initial analyses lay the
      foundation for future studies that will dissect the functional
      elements of the genomes in exquisite detail and that will help
      understand how ecological specialization is reflected in genome
      evolution.  Finally, this work presents a model for selecting a
      cluster of closely related species for whole genome sequencing,
      allowing better understanding of the gene products and other
      functional elements encoded by the genome of a species of biological
      or practical importance.
    
    
    Kellis, MIT team announce significant findings in fly genome studies.
    http://www.eecs.mit.edu/cgi-bin/announcements.cgi?page=2007/data/345.dat
    
      Manolis Kellis, the Karl Van Tassel Career Development Assistant
      Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, and
      also affiliated with the Computer Science and Artificial
      Intelligence Lab, (CSAIL) and the Broad Institute of MIT and
      Harvard, has announced the culmination of several years of efforts
      to describe the sequencing and analysis of 12 Drosophila
      genomes. The work, a large-scale project comprising a diverse
      interdisciplinary team of scientists and co-led by the group at MIT,
      and also including scientists at the Whitehead Institute for
      Biomedical Research and the Harvard Department of Molecular and
      Cellular Biology, uncovers the functional elements encoded in the
      fruit fly genome as well as their evolutionary dynamics. The work
      resulted in many novel findings about the biology of animal genomes,
      and the computational approaches used promise in this work is that
      the approach may also to help unlock the secrets of many other
      genomes, including those of the human genome.
    
      This work appears in the Nov. 8 issue of Nature and in more than 40
      accompanying papers in Genome Research and other journals.
    
      The group at MIT, including the Broad Institute and the Whitehead
      Institute for Biomedical Research, led the discovery effort, the
      first of its kind and scale, ranging across protein-coding genes,
      RNA genes, microRNAs, regulatory motifs, and regulatory networks. By
      comparing the 12 species, they Kellis and his colleagues were able
      to discover thousands of new genes and other functional elements in
      the fruit fly, learning a tremendous amount about the animal
      biologygenomes of animal genomes, and revealing new insights into
      their functioning and regulation, and the scaling of comparative
      discovery power with many species. In particular, the analysis
      showed that some protein-coding genes defy the traditional rules of
      protein translation, reading through stop codons for sometimes
      hundreds of amino-acids, and some microRNA genes can produce many
      functional products from a single regions, encoded in overlapping
      ways.
    
      Kellis reports: "The results have major implications on the
      understanding of the human genome, and the our team at MIT is now
      leading the an effort on the to discover the functional elements in
      the human genome analysis of by comparing 32 eutherian mammals to
      understand the human. We are already now using similar methods to
      analyze 32 mammalian genomesin the human, in order to help
      understand the human genomecombined with large-scale experiments to
      study tissue-specificity, cell differentiation, and epigenomics,"
      Kellis explains. "We should be able to apply tThe methodology of
      using evolutionary signatures to discover functional elements is
      general, and should be applicable to any group of closely related
      species."
    
    
    Computational comparison of multiple Drosophila genomes proves to be a powerful research tool.
    http://www.csail.mit.edu/events/news/2007/drosophila.html
    
      CSAIL's Computational Biology Group led by Manolis Kellis co-led one
      of the first large-scale comparisons of multiple animal
      genomes. Results of the project will appear in four papers in
      Nature, and 40 companion papers in Genome Research, Genetics, Nature
      Genetics, and other journals.
    
      One of the unique aspects of this project is that it was led by
      computational scientists, working with dozens of experimental labs
      to validate and test hypotheses. "Our group at MIT led the discovery
      effort, the first of its kind and scale, ranging across
      protein-coding genes, RNA genes, microRNAs, regulatory motifs, and
      regulatory networks," says CSAIL PI and Broad Institue Associate
      Member, Manolis Kellis. "By comparing 12 species the fruit fly
      Drosophila, we were able to discover a tremendous amount about the
      biology of animal genomes and reveal new insights into their
      functioning and regulation. The technique of comparing genomes of
      multiple related species also provides a powerful methodology that
      could help researchers in the study of other genomes, including that
      of humans."
    
    
    Massive Project Reveals Shortcomings Of Modern Genome Analysis
    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/11/071107160222.htm
    
      The sequencing and comparison of 12 fruit fly genomes -- the result
      of a massive collaboration of hundreds of scientists from more than
      100 institutions in 16 countries -- has thrust forward researchers'
      understanding of fruit flies, a popular animal model in science. But
      even human genome biologists may want to take note: The project also
      has revealed considerable flaws in the way they identify genes.
    
      "We've made huge progress in recent years with many genomes,
      including humans, but a lot of the problems can't be solved by
      simply dumping data into a computer and having truth and light come
      out the other end," said Indiana University Bloomington biologist
      Thomas Kaufman, who co-led the project. "One of the things we've
      learned from this project is that when you compare a lot of
      different but related genomes, you are more likely to see the genes
      that are buried in all that A-C-T-G mush."
    
      Two current papers in Nature separately report the results of the
      four-year genome project and use the data to draw some conclusions
      about the fruit fly genus Drosophila, particularly its star species,
      the human nuisance Drosophila melanogaster. Among the papers'
      conclusions is the idea that resolving any individual species'
      genome is greatly enhanced when related genomes are compared to it.
    
      "This remarkable scientific achievement underscores the value of
      sequencing and comparing many closely-related species, especially
      those with great potential to enhance our understanding of
      fundamental biological processes," said Francis S. Collins, director
      of NHGRI. "Thanks to the consortium's hard work, scientists around
      the world now have a rich new source of genomic data that can be
      mined in many different ways and applied to other important model
      systems as well as humans."
    
      The consortium purposely chose a wide variety of fruit flies for
      study, guessing correctly that both gene similarities and
      differences among the 12 species would be easier to identify. Some
      of the Drosophila species the scientists studied are closely related
      to D. melanogaster, some not. Some of the flies fulfill very
      specialized ecological niches, such as D. sechellia, which has
      evolved a unique ability to detoxify the fruit of the Seychelles'
      noni tree. The other 10 species the consortium examined were
      D. pseudoobscura, D. simulans, D. yakuba, D. erecta, D. ananassae,
      D. persimilis, D. willistoni, D. virilis, D. grimshawi, and the
      cactus-loving D. mojavensis. D. melanogaster's genome was published
      in 2000 and D. pseudoobscura's genome was published in 2005. The
      other genomes are newly published.
    
      In comparing the 12 genomes, the scientists found 1,193 new
      protein-coding genes and hundreds of new functional elements,
      including regulatory sequences that determine how quickly genes are
      expressed, and genes that encode functional RNAs such as small
      nuclear RNAs. They also learned certain genes appear to be evolving
      faster than others, such as the genes associated with smell and
      taste, sex and reproduction, and defenses against pathogens.
    
      The Drosophila 12 Genomes Consortium found that D. melanogaster
      shares about 77 percent of its genes with the other 11 species they
      studied. The scientists also found errors in about 3 percent of
      previously sequenced D. melanogaster protein-coding genes,
      correcting 414 gene sequences on record.
    
      A vexing problem for genomicists is finding genes and other
      important DNA sequences in heterochromatin, tightly packed areas of
      chromosomes presumed to experience little
      expression. Heterochromatin is common in animal genomes.
    
      "The heterochromatin is very hard to analyze," Kaufman
      said. "Studies show heterochromatin changes the most. It's full of
      intermediate- and full-repeat sequences. And there are genes buried
      in this stuff."
    
      The conventions for locating the genes that encode proteins are
      pretty well established. The lingering problem for genomics
      biologists is locating genes whose parts are interrupted repeatedly,
      as well as locating genes that do not code for proteins.
    
      By comparing a huge number of genomes, these sorts of genes are
      relatively easy to locate. Genes that do important things for cells
      or tissues are more likely to be "conserved" over time; that is,
      they don't change much despite millions of years of mutations.
    
      Although fruit flies have a genome that is 25 times smaller than the
      human genome, many of the flies' genes correspond to those in humans
      and control the same biological functions. In recent years, fruit
      fly research has led to discoveries related to the influence of
      genes on diseases, animal development, population genetics, cell
      biology, neurobiology, behavior, physiology and evolution.
    
      One of the companion pieces accompanying this week's Nature papers
      was written by IUB computational biologist Matthew Hahn. Hahn
      reports in PLoS Genetics that although all 12 Drosophila species
      have about the same number of genes (14,000), the genomes are more
      dynamic than one might expect.
    
      "The highest turnover in gene number occurs in genes involved in sex
      and reproduction," Hahn said. "Our results demonstrate that the
      apparent stasis in total gene number among species has masked rapid
      turnover in individual gene gain and loss. It is likely that this
      evolutionary revolving door has played a large role in shaping the
      morphological, physiological, and metabolic differences among
      species. This is the reason the 12 species only share 77 percent of
      their genes."
    
      Kaufman co-founded the project with Cornell University's Andrew
      Clark, North Carolina State University's Gregory Gibson, Howard
      Hughes Medical Institute's Eugene Myers, University of California
      Berkeley's Patrick O'Grady, and University of Arizona's Therese
      Markow. FlyBase, a joint project of IU Bloomington, UC Berkeley, and
      Cambridge University, helped researchers access and study the 12
      sequenced Drosophila genomes. Kaufman also directs the National
      Institutes of Health-funded Drosophila Genome Resource Center.
    
      Sequencing work was handled by research staff at the Baylor College
      of Medicine, the Broad Institute of M.I.T. and Harvard University,
      the Washington University School of Medicine, Agencourt Bioscience
      Corp., and the J. Craig Venter Science Institute.
    
    
    Decoding effort reveal fly species' DNA 
    http://www.news.harvard.edu/gazette/2007/11.08/09-fruitflies.html
    
      Collaboration of researchers from 16 nations sequences fruit fly
      genomes
    
      An enormous effort to decode the DNA of one of science's most
      important laboratory animals - the fruit fly - ended in success this
      week as a collaboration of researchers from 16 nations announced the
      sequencing of 10 fly species' genomes.
    
      The research allows the extraordinary side-by-side comparison of the
      DNA of 12 species of fruit flies - two had already been decoded - as
      scientists search to understand the workings of individual genes and
      how those genes translate into specific physical characteristics.
    
      Already the research has produced results. Scientists involved in
      the collaboration also announced the findings of their initial
      analysis: the discovery of thousands of new genes and other
      functional elements such as DNA segments responsible for turning
      genes on and off.
    
      "The availability of the 12 fruit fly genomes resulted in a dramatic
      increase in resolution, allowing us to examine how evolution has
      fine-tuned biological processes. Our work shows that discovery power
      increases with the number of genomes available for comparison," said
      Harvard Professor of Molecular and Cellular Biology William Gelbart,
      one of the project's leaders.
    
      The results were announced in a series of papers in the Nov. 8 issue
      of the journal Nature. The work, conducted by hundreds of
      researchers at more than 100 institutions, was supported by the
      National Institutes of Health's National Human Genome Research
      Institute.
    
      "This remarkable scientific achievement underscores the value of
      sequencing and comparing many closely related species, especially
      those with great potential to enhance our understanding of
      fundamental biological processes," said National Human Genome
      Research Institute Director Francis Collins. "Scientists around the
      world now have a rich new source of genomic data that can be mined
      in many different ways and applied to other important model systems
      as well as humans."
    
      With a life span of just weeks, the fruit fly has been an important
      model organism in genetic studies for decades and has helped
      researchers unravel the rules that govern inheritance. Though there
      are many differences between fruit flies and humans, the two also
      share many genes that regulate the same biological functions.
    
      The dozen fruit flies now sequenced all belong to the genus
      Drosophila, which has about 2,500 different species. Though some may
      think there's little difference between fruit fly types, Gelbart
      said the genetic variation between fruit fly species is as large as
      that found among mammals. Fruit flies are adapted to life in a wide
      variety of conditions, from the desert to the rain forest, and have
      a wide range of physical traits.
    
      With researchers spanning many institutions around the world,
      Gelbart said the project, officially called the Drosophila
      Comparative Genome Sequencing and Analysis Consortium, was at times
      a challenge to keep moving forward. Gelbart accomplished the feat
      together with eight other project leaders from the Broad Institute
      of MIT and Harvard, Cornell University, the University of
      California, Berkeley, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, the
      Agencourt Bioscience Corp., the University of Manchester, the
      National Institutes of Health, the University of Arizona, Indiana
      University, and the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence
      Laboratory in Cambridge, Mass.
    
      Among the findings from their side-by-side analysis of the dozen
      fruit fly genomes, researchers were able to determine that some
      genes are evolving faster than others. Genes involved in sex, taste,
      smell, detoxification, and metabolism seem to be evolving most
      rapidly. One example showed that a fly native to the Seychelles
      islands, with a limited universe of foods, is losing taste receptors
      much faster than other species.
    
      Researchers also discovered the first known animal to lack genes to
      produce selenoproteins, a type of protein needed to get rid of
      excess selenium in the body, in the fruit fly species Drosophila
      willistoni.
    
      The side-by-side comparison not only allowed the discovery of new
      genetic elements, it also allowed the correction of past errors. The
      results call into question more than 400 genes previously thought to
      encode proteins in the first species to be sequenced, Drosophila
      melanogaster.
    
      The work, which will be available to other researchers, not only
      opens up numerous new avenues for inquiry, it creates an enormous
      bank of information available to future scientists probing life's
      mysteries.
    
      "Like most science, it raises more questions than it answers, but
      that's OK," Gelbart said.
    
    
    Making Sense of Anti-Sense MicroRNAs
    http://www.innovations-report.de/html/berichte/biowissenschaften_chemie/bericht-100712.html
    
      Three independent papers in the January 1st issue of G&D report on
      the discovery of a bidirectionally transcribed microRNA (miRNA)
      locus in Drosophila.
    
      The studies from Drs. Alexander Stark and Manolis Kellis (MIT) and
      colleagues, and from Dr. Eric Lai (MSKCC) and colleagues, both
      reveal that antisense transcription of the Hox miRNA locus,
      miR-iab-4, generates the novel miRNA precursor mir-iab-8, which is
      processed into active regulatory RNAs.
    
      When ectopically expressed, mir-iab-8 generates homeotic phenotypes
      via direct repression of Hox gene targets.
    
      The paper from Dr. Welcome Bender (Harvard Medical School)
      demonstrates that knock out of miR-iab-4 reveals the existence of a
      miRNA transcribed from the opposite strand. Furthermore, the loss of
      the antisense miRNA causes subtle derepression of a hox gene and
      results in sterility of the mutant flies.
    
      The identification of additional antisense miRNAs in Drosophila and
      mammals suggests this as a mechanism that may contribute to the
      diversification of miRNA function.
    
    
    MIT reports new twist in microRNA biology
    http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2008/micro-rna-0109.html
    
      Computational biology group identifies new mechanism of gene regulation
    
      MIT scientists have found a new way that DNA can carry out its work
      that is about as surprising as discovering that a mold used to cast
      a metal tool can also serve as a tool itself, with two complementary
      shapes each showing distinct functional roles.
    
      Professor Manolis Kellis and postdoctoral research fellow Alexander
      Stark report in the January 1 issue of the journal Genes &
      Development that in certain DNA sequences, both strands of a DNA
      segment can perform useful functions, each encoding a distinct
      molecule that helps control cell functions.
    
      DNA works by complementarity: paired DNA strands serve as a template
      for each other during DNA replication, and ordinarily only a single
      DNA strand serves as a template to produce RNA strands, which then
      go on to produce proteins. The process is similar to the way each
      bump or dent in a mold is paired with a corresponding dent or bump
      in the resulting molded object.
    
      While many RNAs are eventually translated into proteins with
      specific functions, some RNA molecules instead act directly,
      carrying out roles inside the cell. Certain RNA genes, known as
      microRNAs, have been shown to play important regulatory roles in the
      cell, often coordinating important events during the development of
      the embryo. These microRNAs fold into relatively simple hairpin
      structures, with two stretches of near-perfect complementary
      sequence folding back onto each other. One of the two 'arms' of a
      hairpin is then processed into a mature microRNA.
    
      The surprising discovery is that for some microRNA genes, both DNA
      strands, instead of just one, encode RNA, and both resulting
      microRNAs fold into hairpins that are processed into mature
      microRNAs. In other words, both the tool and its mold appear to be
      functional. Kellis and Stark found two such microRNA pairs in the
      fruit fly, and eight more such pairs in the mouse.
    
      The idea that there could be such dual-function strands, where both
      DNA strands encode functional RNA products, "had never even been
      hypothesized," Kellis says. But followup work confirmed that they
      did indeed function in this way. The work suggests that other such
      unexpected pairings, with both DNA strands encoding important
      functions, may also exist in a variety of species.
    
      This discovery builds on a similar, earlier surprising finding about
      microRNA regulation. In December, Stark and Kellis reported that
      both arms of a single microRNA hairpin can also produce distinct,
      functional microRNAs, with distinct targets. Together, these two
      findings suggest that a single gene can encode as many as four
      different functions - one hairpin from each of the two DNA strands,
      and then one microRNA from each of the two arms of each hairpin.
    
      These recent papers are the latest example of the power of using
      computational tools to investigate the genomes of multiple species,
      known as comparative genomics. The Kellis group has used this
      approach to discover protein-coding genes, RNAs, microRNAs,
      regulatory motifs, and targets of individual regulators in diverse
      organisms ranging from yeast and fruit flies to mouse and human.
    
      "This represents a new phase in genomics-making biological
      discoveries sitting not at the lab bench, but at the computer
      terminal," Kellis says.
    
      Kellis is the Karl Van Tassel Career Development Assistant Professor
      in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and
      an associate member of the Broad Institute. He grew up in Greece and
      France and earned his B.S., M.Eng., and Ph.D. from MIT, and he was
      appointed to the faculty here in 2004. At 30, he has already earned
      numerous awards and accolades, including a place on the list of the
      35 top innovators under 35 by Technology Review magazine in 2006.
    
      Kellis' work is supported in part by grants from the National
      Institues of Health and the National Science Foundation. Alex Stark
      is supported by a Human Frontier Science Program fellowship.
    
    
    Human Motifs Revealed - Broad Institute Press Release
    http://www.broad.mit.edu/cgi-bin/news/display_news.cgi?id=134
    
      Because so many genes have been conserved, or passed along from
      species to species throughout evolution, comparing genomes across
      species has emerged as a powerful tool for discovering functional
      elements. Comparative genomics has been extremely successful in
      identifying protein-coding genes and large conserved non-coding
      elements in human.
    
      But the majority of the non-coding elements remain largely
      unknown. The most elusive are small regulatory motifs, of about
      seven to ten base pairs, that modulate gene usage.
    
      "We set out to systematically discover an encyclopedia of regulatory
      motifs in the human, through the lens of evolutionary conservation,"
      said Manolis Kellis, co-senior author of the study and associate
      member of the Broad Institute. "By comparing multiple species, we
      determined subtle conserved signals based on their repetition across
      the genome."
    
      These regulatory motifs define the dynamic nature of the cell,
      dictating which signals a gene will respond to, and which specific
      tissues--such as liver, heart, or muscle - a gene will be expressed
      in, said the researchers.
    
      "Fortunately, evolution is a good note keeper," said Kellis, who is
      also an assistant professor of computer science at MIT. "By
      referencing evolution's notes, we are now one step closer to a more
      thorough understanding of the human genome's controlling
      machinery. Once this machinery is known, we can then hopefully
      control the signals for medical purposes."
    
      In the March 17 issue of Nature, the Broad researchers report:
    
      * more than a hundred new regulatory motifs involved in the first
        stage of gene regulation, known as transcriptional initiation; and
    
      * 105 new regulatory motifs involved in post-transcriptional
        control, many of which are targets of microRNAs, a recently
        discovered mechanism of gene repression.
    
      Surprisingly, the study also led to hundreds of new microRNA genes,
      a number much higher than previous estimates suggested. "Nearly
      one-half of the motifs involved in post-transcriptional regulation
      are associated with microRNAs, demonstrating the extraordinary
      importance of this recently discovered regulatory mechanism," said
      Xiaohui Xie, first author of the study and a postdoctoral associate
      at the Broad.
    
      The researchers now estimate that at least 20 percent of genes are
      regulated by microRNAs, an estimate much higher than previously
      expected. These tiny, single-stranded pieces of RNA may be one of
      the principal players in regulating cellular mechanisms. MicroRNAs
      can inhibit transcribed messages, or interrupt a gene's ability to
      make protein.
    
      The study team employed an analysis method used recently by Broad
      scientists to study four related yeast species genomes. This work
      published in the May 15, 2003 issue of Nature by Kellis et. al.,
      showed that it is possible to systematically identify both genes and
      regulatory elements by comparing a small number of genomes in a
      related species. It was unclear however whether such analyses would
      be possibly in the vastly more complex human genome.
    
      "Evolution is one of the most powerful tools for understanding how
      genes are regulated in health and disease," said Eric Lander,
      co-senior author of the study and the founding director of the Broad
      Institute. "Our ultimate goal is to use evolutionary comparison to
      create a comprehensive catalog of common regulatory motifs in the
      human genome."
    
      In addition to the authors described above, included in the study
      are Broad researchers Jun Lu; Edward Kulbokas; Todd Golub, who is
      also affiliated with Dana-Farber Cancer Institute; Vamsi Mootha, who
      is also affiliated with Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard
      Medical School; and Kerstin Lindblad-Toh.
    
    
    Human gene count tumbles again
    http://www.broad.mit.edu/cgi-bin/news/display_news.cgi?id=4163
    
       Estimates of the number of genes in the human genome have ranged
       wildly over the past two decades, from 20,000 all the way up to
       150,000. By the time the working draft of the human genome was
       published in 2001, the best approximation stood at 35,000, yet even
       that number has fallen. A new analysis, one that harnesses the
       power of comparing genome sequences of various organisms, now
       reveals that the true number of human genes is about 20,500,
       thousands fewer than what is currently listed in human gene
       catalogs.
    
       The work, led by researchers at the Broad Institute of MIT and
       Harvard and appearing online in the November 27 issue of PNAS, has
       implications beyond merely settling the debate over how many genes
       are in the human genome. An accurate gene count can help identify
       the locations of genes and their functions, an important step in
       translating genomic information into biomedical advances.
    
       Ironically, the way genes are recognized has triggered much of the
       confusion over the human gene count. Scientists on the hunt for
       typical genes - that is, the ones that encode proteins - have
       traditionally set their sights on so-called open reading frames,
       which are long stretches of 300 or more nucleotides, or "letters"
       of DNA, bookended by genetic start and stop signals. This method
       produced the most recent gene count of roughly 25,000, but the
       number came under scrutiny after the 2002 publication of the mouse
       genome revealed that many human genes lacked mouse counterparts and
       vice versa. Such a discrepancy seemed suspicious in part because
       evolution tends to preserve gene sequences - genes, by virtue of
       the proteins they encode, usually serve crucial biological
       roles. But like it or not, the 25,000 DNA sequences were already
       listed in the catalogs of human protein-coding genes, and skeptics
       had no systematic way to remove them. "At that point, no one had
       gone through the gene catalogs with a fine-toothed comb to find
       evidence that they weren't valid," said Michele Clamp, first author
       of the study and senior computational biologist at the Broad
       Institute.
    
       Far from blatant mistakes, non-gene sequences can masquerade as
       true genes if they are long enough and happen by chance to fall
       between start and stop signals. Despite having gene-like
       characteristics, these open reading frames may not encode
       proteins. Instead, they might have other functions or possibly none
       at all.
    
       To distinguish such misidentified genes from true ones, the
       research team, led by Clamp and Broad Institute director Eric
       Lander, developed a method that takes advantage of another hallmark
       of protein-coding genes: conservation by evolution. The researchers
       considered genes to be valid if and only if similar sequences could
       be found in other mammals to nearly 22,000 genes in the Ensembl
       gene catalog, the analysis revealed 1,177 "orphan" DNA
       sequences. These orphans looked like proteins because of their open
       reading frames, but were not found in either the mouse or dog
       genomes.
    
       Although this was strong evidence that the sequences were not true
       protein-coding genes, it was not quite convincing enough to justify
       their removal from the human gene catalogs. Two other scenarios
       could, in fact, explain their absence from other mammalian
       genomes. For instance, the genes could be unique among primates,
       new inventions that appeared after the divergence of mouse and dog
       ancestors from primate ancestors. Alternatively, the genes could
       have been more ancient creations - present in a common mammalian
       ancestor - that were lost in mouse and dog lineages yet retained in
       humans.
    
       If either of these possibilities were true, then the orphan genes
       should appear in other primate genomes, in addition to our own. To
       explore this, the researchers compared the orphan sequences to the
       DNA of two primate cousins, chimpanzees and macaques. After careful
       genomic comparisons, the orphan genes were found to be true to
       their name - they were absent from both primate genomes. This
       evidence strengthened the case for stripping these orphans of the
       title, "gene."
    
       After extending the analysis to two more gene catalogs and
       accounting for other misclassified genes, the team's work
       invalidated a total of nearly 5,000 DNA sequences that had been
       incorrectly added to the lists of protein-coding genes, reducing
       the current estimate to roughly 20,500.
    
       In addition to suggesting a major revision to the human gene count,
       this work provides a set of rules for evaluating any future
       proposed additions to the human gene catalog. It also underscores
       the benefit of genome sequencing projects. "Without several primate
       genomes, we wouldn't have been able to put the final nail in the
       coffin of these putative genes," said Clamp.
    
       More broadly, the research reveals that little invention of genes
       has occurred since mammalian ancestors diverged from the
       non-mammalian lineage. "There's no real creativity going on in the
       mammalian genome," explained Clamp. That means that the number,
       structure, and function of protein-coding genes are not expected to
       differ very much from mammal to mammal, so what makes humans
       different from mice and dogs likely lies outside this realm of the
       genome. Clamp and her Broad Institute colleagues are now peering
       into the genomes of many other mammals, in an attempt to explain
       what parts of our genome truly make us human.
    
    
    
    Open|DOOR Interview (Nov 2003)
    http://alum.mit.edu/ne/opendoor/200311/kellis.html
    
       Manolis Kellis (Kamvysselis), SB '99, MEng '99, PhD '03, is first
       author on a breakthrough comparative genomics article published in
       "Nature". The work, completed with colleagues at the Whitehead
       Institute/MIT Center for Genome Research, distinguished important
       biological signals from surrounding nonfunctional nucleotides in
       yeast and has important human genome applications.
    
       What did baker's yeast, an organism that turns sugar to
       alcohol, teach your team about the human genome?
    
       Yeast has taught us surprisingly many lessons about the human
       genome. As an experimental system, it has been the model organism
       of choice for developing genome-wide technologies for monitoring
       complete cell states, simultaneously observing all genes and
       proteins. For our team, it became the model organism for
       comparative genomics.
    
       We work towards the ability to directly interpret genomic
       information, namely to read in a string of ACGT characters and
       recognize within it meaningful functional elements, such as genes
       and regulatory motifs that control the expression of genes. The
       difficulty to identify such elements comes from the fact that they
       are hidden amidst thousands of non-functional
       nucleotides. Discovering functional features is equivalent to
       extracting signal from noise.
    
       This is where comparative genomics comes in. Across evolutionary
       time, mutations in non-functional regions accumulate by genetic
       drift, but mutations in functional regions are selected against by
       natural selection. By comparing closely related species, we can
       thus recognize strongly conserved regions as likely to be
       functional, and weakly conserved regions as likely to be
       non-functional.
    
       Yeast proved to be a wonderful organism for comparative
       genomics. Its small and relatively simple genome made it feasible
       to completely sequence multiple relatives and align them across
       their complete genomes. We were for the first time able to study
       the conservation patterns of genes and regulatory motifs across
       four complete eukaryotic genomes, and develop computational methods
       for discovering biological signals. Finally, the extensive
       biological knowledge of gene function in yeast allowed us to
       confirm our findings and our comparative methods.
    
       We hope to apply similar methods for the understanding of the human
       genome, by comparing it to chimp, mouse, rat, dog, chicken, and a
       multitude of genomes whose sequencing is under way. This will not
       be an easy task due to the increased complexity of these organisms,
       but the lessons learned from yeast are proving to be invaluable.
    
       How are you applying your computer science expertise to
       comparative genomics?
    
       Computer science is playing an increasingly central role in modern
       biology. This has been enabled by the quantitative nature of
       biological data sources and efforts to represent biological
       knowledge in a controlled vocabulary. Additionally, technological
       advances have increased the ability to obtain large-scale
       information of cell state, leading to an explosion in both the
       quantity and the types of available data.
    
       Together, these transformations of modern biology have made the use
       of computational approaches in biology not only possible, but also
       imperative. The hypothesis-driven approach of specific experiments
       designed to answer well-posed questions is now complemented by
       data-driven approaches that generate hypotheses largely in silico,
       based on large-scale biological data. Computational tools that can
       discover meaningful patterns by mining through large quantities of
       data can be central in biological discovery.
    
       This is where a computer science background has proved to be very
       useful. Understanding the biology is only the first step. One has
       to then construct computational representations for the data at
       hand, develop algorithms to manipulate the resulting computational
       structures, define statistical tests to select meaningful results,
       and interpret these back into the realm of biology. To obtain sound
       biological results, the underlying computational methods must be
       sound.
    
       Each aspect of the yeast work required a strong computational
       component. To align the four yeast species, we developed
       graph-theoretic algorithms for resolving the ambiguities in the
       correspondence of genes and regions across the species. To identify
       protein-coding genes, we developed models for nucleotide change
       within genes and intergenic regions, and built a classifier for
       candidate genes according to these models. To discover regulatory
       motifs, we formulated statistical tests to evaluate the genome-wide
       conservation of sequence patterns, and built algorithms to refine
       these motifs into a small dictionary of regulatory elements.
    
       The marriage of computer science and biology is a necessity. My
       biology friends like to joke that computer science will be
       remembered as that little field that helped understand biology. My
       computer science friends instead respond: "Aah, biology! Finally a
       problem hard enough for computer science to solve." Good-spirited
       jokes aside, both parties acknowledge the birth of a field in its
       own right, where computation and biology combine to bring the best
       from both worlds. The whole makes for a rapidly moving field, where
       the rules are changed every few months, powerful paradigms emerge
       and secrets are revealed.
    
    
    BioIT World
    http://www.bio-itworld.com/archive/bases/040104.html
    
    
       The Search for Whole Genome Duplication
    
       Researchers at the Broad Institute have uncovered unequivocal
       evidence for the existence of WGD - whole genome duplication
       (WGD). Manolis Kellis, Bruce Biren, and Eric Lander have shown for
       the first time that baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae)
       originated via the duplication of the entire genome of an ancestral
       strain; this predecessor subsequently lost some 90 percent of its
       genes by various means to give rise to the current S. cerevisiae
       genome.
    
       "This is the first time we actually see that an organism underwent
       complete genome duplication and went back to a single-copy state,"
       Kellis said. WGD can occur when a cell's DNA replicates, but the
       cell fails to divide as normal. From an evolutionary perspective,
       WGD allows the newly duplicated genes to acquire new, potentially
       advantageous roles, or adapt to new environments. Of course, many
       genes are deleted or mutated, such that most traces of the
       widescale duplication are quickly expunged.
    
       The Broad team report in Nature that it found the missing link by
       sequencing the complete genome of a different yeast species,
       Kluyveromyces waltii, which diverged before the duplication. They
       showed that each region of this pre-duplication relative
       corresponds to exactly two regions of baker's yeast, providing
       definitive proof of duplication.
    
       Following deletion of 90 percent of the duplicated genes, baker's
       yeast returned to having one gene per function for most of the
       genome, ending up with only 457 additional genes, many of which are
       devoted to sugar metabolism. "It will be interesting to see just
       how far such distant echoes of genomic upheaval may be traced," the
       authors conclude.
    
       The study follows last year's comparative genomics tour de force by
       Kellis and Lander, comparing the genomes of four yeast species,
       also published in Nature.
    
       M. Kellis et al. " Proof and evolutionary analysis of ancient
       genome duplication in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.
    
    
          
    
    Genome News Network
    http://www.genomenewsnetwork.org/articles/2004/03/19/evolution.php
    
       An odd little fungus that grows in cotton seeds and a little-known
       species of yeast are giving scientists an idea how organisms evolve
       and take on diverse functions. Two new studies report that the
       duplication of the genome of a primitive fungus more than 100
       million years ago gave rise to common baker's yeast.
    
       The studies resolve an ongoing controversy over how the common
       yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae evolved. The organism is widely
       studied because many of the genes that control the yeast's function
       are also important in humans.
    
       The new findings also give scientists clues about how gene
       duplications can drive evolution. While a backup copy of an
       essential gene continues to perform needed duties, a second copy is
       free to mutate and take on a new role in the organism.
    
       "There have been two camps with different views of how yeast
       evolved," says Manolis Kellis of the Broad Institute in Cambridge,
       Massachusetts, who participated in one of the new studies. "Some
       people believe a whole genome was duplicated and others believe
       smaller gene clusters were duplicated. We now have the missing
       piece of evidence that points to whole-genome duplication."
    
       Manolis and his colleagues sequenced a species of yeast called
       Kluyveromyces waltii. At the same time, a team led by Peter
       Philippsen of the University of Basel in Switzerland, sequenced the
       genome of the filamentous fungus Ashbya gossypii. Both studies
       suggest that a genome duplication in a common descendant led to the
       creation of baker's yeast.
    
       Ashbya has 4,718 genes on seven chromosomes and Kluyveromyces has
       5,230 genes on eight chromosomes. Duplication of the genome of
       their common descendant created an organism with about 10,000
       genes. Over time, most of the duplicated genes were lost, but some
       mutated and took on new functions. In the end, the baker's yeast
       genome emerged with 5,714 genes on 16 chromosomes.
    
       Philippsen, who studies the fungus Ashbya, notes that baker's yeast
       and Ashbya have many genes in common but very different
       functions. Ashbya is a cotton pathogen, while baker's yeast is used
       to make bread.
    
       Baker's yeast grows as a single-cell organism that grows and buds
       off into separate cells, whereas the fungus grows as a long
       filament containing many nuclei. The fungus grows from one end of a
       filament until it runs out of nutrients, creating a branched
       multi-cellular organism.
    
       "These organisms have similar sets of genes, but very different
       lifestyles," says Philippsen. "The big challenge now is to figure
       out why."
    
       One clue comes from looking at some of the duplicated
       genes. Although most of the duplicated genes have disappeared in
       baker's yeast, many gene pairs remain, but have mutated to acquire
       different functions.
    
       For example, one gene in baker's yeast that is important for gene
       replication has a twin that silences, or shuts down, other
       genes. The researchers believe that many of these paired genes with
       different functions have driven evolution.
    
       "When you have duplicated genes, many of these genes will be lost
       over time, because you only need one to do the job," says
       Kellis. "But for some gene pairs, one gene has preserved the
       ancestral function while the other is free to evolve, sometimes
       taking on entirely new roles. This leads to innovation and the
       creation of new species."
    
       Baker's yeast provides the first clear example that whole-genome
       duplication plays a role in evolution. Some researchers have
       proposed similar events in the evolution of plants and vertebrates.
    
       "We would have to find an ancestor with a non-duplicated genome to
       see if similar events played a role in human evolution," says
       Kellis. "So far, this hasn't happened, but people are looking."
    
    
       
    
    Genome News Network
    http://www.genomenewsnetwork.org/articles/05_03/yeast.shtml
    
       Yeast Genome Revisited
    
       Ever since the yeast genome was sequenced seven years ago,
       researchers have debated the best way to identify the "true"
       genes-those DNA sequences that code for proteins. Now, researchers
       have sequenced three more yeast genomes and say that the current
       list of genes needs to be revised.
    
       By comparing the new genome sequences with the original, the
       researchers uncovered nearly 50 new genes and 70 stretches of DNA
       that regulate yeast genes. They also propose that about 500 DNA
       sequences previously thought to be genes should be crossed off the
       list.
    
       The research, published in Nature, goes far beyond bread and beer:
       It could serve as a model for identifying every gene in the human
       genome. Furthermore, many yeast genes have counterparts in humans,
       including some that play a role in cancer.
    
       "This study shows how valuable it is to sequence the genomes of
       closely related species," says Steven L. Salzberg of the Institute
       for Genomic Research (TIGR) in Rockville, Maryland, who wrote an
       accompanying News & Views article. "If we line up the genomes and
       see the same sequences in each species, it tells us that a gene is
       important."
    
       "This is just what we need to do, and in fact are doing, with the
       human genome," he adds.
    
       When the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae-used to make beer
       and bread-was sequenced in 1996, researchers found nearly 6,000
       likely genes (based on the length of the sequence and the presence
       of specific signals that indicate where genes begin and
       end). Subsequent estimates have ranged from 4,800 to 6,400
       genes. According to the Nature paper, the number should be 5,538
       genes.
    
       In the new study, Manolis Kellis, a graduate student in Eric
       S. Lander's laboratory at the Whitehead Institute in Cambridge,
       Massachusetts, and his colleagues analyzed the three other yeast
       species and compared them to S. cerevisiae.
    
       "For each possible gene sequence, we looked to see if there was
       evolutionary pressure to preserve that stretch of DNA," says
       Kellis. "We discarded about 500 sequences that were not
       conserved. Evolution had no reason to care about these sequences."
    
       For Kellis, the study's most exciting discovery was finding more
       than 70 new sequences that regulate gene activity.
    
       "We found two types of regulatory sequences," he says. "Some
       sequences act like little tiny traffic lights, telling the gene
       when to turn on and when to turn off. Others act as zip codes, or
       shipping addresses. They tell the cell where to send the message,
       once a gene is made into RNA."
    
       The researchers also found that the most variation in yeast genes
       occurs on the ends of chromosomes, in regions known as
       telomeres. Telomeres have not been completely sequenced in the
       human genome.
    
       "Telomeres get exchanged a lot more rapidly," says Salzberg. "My
       twenty-five cent bet is that the same thing is going on in
       humans. I would like to see telomeres sequenced in humans. This is
       where things are most likely to be happening, where gene
       rearrangements are likely to occur."
    
       He adds, "We need to finish the human sequence down to the last
       base."
    
    
    Genome Biology
    http://genomebiology.com/researchnews/default.asp?arx_id=gb-spotlight-20030515-01
    
       Many yeasts win the vote
       Comparative genomics with two or more related species reveal limitations of single genome analysis
    
       The Human Genome Mapping Project set out to unravel the secrets of the
       genes by determining the primary sequence of the human genome, but it
       has become clear that this information is insufficient. Determination
       of functional and coding sequences in a primary genome sequence
       depends on an a priori knowledge of gene function and on statistics,
       and so the information obtained is incomplete and probabilistic. In
       the May 15 Nature, Manolis Kellis and colleagues at the Whitehead
       Institute/Massachusetts Institute of Technology Center for Genome
       Research develop and apply a general approach to determining regions
       of significance in primary sequence by whole genome comparison of
       several related species. They reasoned that evolution would conserve
       protein coding and regulatory elements and that comparison of more
       than two genomes would increase the signal:noise ratio by highlighting
       changes that were not due to chance (Nature 423:241-254, 2003).
    
       Kellis et al. compared the sequences of four related species of
       yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, S. paradoxus, S. mikatae, and
       S. bayanus and employed a "voting system" to reach a conclusion on
       the validity of theoretical open reading frames (ORFs) and on the
       accuracy of the determination of proposed gene structures such as
       promoters, translation start and stop sites, and intron/exon
       boundaries. They propose to reduce the number of genes in the yeast
       gene catalogue by eliminating 503 invalid ORFs and to redefine gene
       structure assignments in at least 300 cases. They identified 188
       genes that encode small proteins of <100 amino acids and many new
       genes and regulatory elements; they were also able to infer
       functions for more than half of their 42 newly discovered sequence
       motifs by categorizing the genes associated with them. In addition,
       they found evidence for rapid genome evolution at all of the
       telomeres.
       
       "The analyses will produce a substantial revision in our knowledge
       of the yeast genome and provide strategic directions for how we
       might select other sequencing targets to advance understanding of
       the human genome," writes Steven Salzberg of The Institute for
       Genomic Research in an accompanying News and Views article. "This
       new study of yeast genomes makes it clear that comparative genome
       sequencing has tremendous analytical power," he concludes.
    
    
    Newswire
    http://www.newswise.com/p/articles/view/503609/
    http://www.separationsnow.com/basehtml/SepH/1,1353,6-1-1-0-0-news_detail-0-1191,00.html
    
       Yeast geneticists get a 2-for-1 deal
    
       Today's humble but extensively studied budding yeast (Saccharomyces
       cerevisiae) evolved when the genome of a distant ancestor became
       duplicated, according to a study published online by Nature this
       week.
    
       Manolis Kellis and colleagues studied the genetic make-up of a
       related yeast species, Kluyveromyces waltii, and compared it with
       that of S. cerevisiae. K. waltii shares a common ancestor with
       S. cerevisiae but diverged before the duplication event took
       place. The team found that key regions of the K. waltii genome are
       duplicated in S. cerevisiae. Originally, the entire genome was
       duplicated, but S. cerevisiae then evicted some 90% of its
       duplicated genes to make the genome fully functional.
    
       Genome duplication may boost evolutionary innovation, the authors
       say - duplicated genes probably supply the raw genetic material
       needed for new functions to emerge, and so could help organisms
       adapt to new environments.
       
    
    Whitehead Press Release
    http://www.wi.mit.edu/news/archives/2004/el_0308.html
    
       Study answers questions on ancestry of yeast genome
    
       CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (Mar. 8, 2004) - In work that may lead to a better
       understanding of genetic diseases, researchers at the Broad
       Institute of MIT, Harvard University and Whitehead Institute for
       Biomedical Research show that baker's yeast was created hundreds of
       millions of years ago when its ancestor temporarily became a kind
       of super-organism with twice the usual number of chromosomes and
       increased potential to evolve.
    
       The study by postdoctoral fellow and lead author Manolis Kellis of
       the Broad (rhymes with "code") Institute; Eric S. Lander, Broad
       director and Member of Whitehead Institute; and Bruce W. Birren,
       co-director of the Broad's sequencing and analysis program will be
       published online by Nature on March 7.
    
       Scientists have postulated that in a handful of instances in
       evolutionary history, cells may have replicated their entire
       genomes in events called whole genome duplication (WGD), but no
       definitive proof existed. The work at the Broad Institute shows
       conclusively for the first time that the well-studied organism
       baker's yeast originated through this little-understood phenomenon,
       resolving a long-standing controversy on the ancestry of the yeast
       genome.
    
       Whole genome duplication may have occurred when a cell replicated
       its DNA normally, as it does every time it divides, but did not
       split it between two resulting cells, or two cells may have
       fused. The result is that a yeast cell with around 5,700 genes
       suddenly had more than 11,000. While one copy of the gene performs
       its designated function, the other is free to perform a new and
       potentially valuable use. In addition, the organism is able to
       evolve more rapidly with natural selection acting on thousands of
       duplicated genes simultaneously, allowing for large-scale
       adaptation to new environments.
    
       This super-organism doesn't come without drawbacks. The excess
       genes cause instability in the genome and are deleted through
       mutation, gene loss and genomic rearrangement. As a result,
       millennia after the event, very few duplicated genes remain. "This
       is the first time we actually see that an organism underwent
       complete genome duplication and went back to a single-copy state,"
       Kellis said. In the case of baker's yeast, roughly 90 percent of
       its duplicated genes were lost. The organism returned to having one
       gene per function for the vast majority of its genome, ending up
       with only 457 additional genes.
    
       What's the advantage to replicating the entire genome and then
       losing half the genes? According to one theory, by replicating the
       whole genome, entire systems (networks and pathways) within the
       organism can evolve together and take on new functions. Yeast,
       which metabolizes sugar and causes fermentation, apparently evolved
       to fill an evolutionary niche around the time that fruit-bearing
       plants appeared, creating an abundance of sugar in the
       environment. "It's the best fermenter out there," Kellis said of
       Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the species the group studied. Many of
       its surviving 457 genes are devoted to sugar metabolism.
    
       If incremental evolution over millennia is like a landscape
       changing through erosion, whole genome duplication is like an
       earthquake. "Direct study of such a cataclysmic event may provide
       major insights into the dynamics of genome evolution and the
       emergence of new functions," the authors write.
    
       Given the massive gene loss and hundreds of rearrangements, little
       evidence of WGD remains within the genome of baker's yeast. Tracing
       the development of a genome over billions of years is like printing
       a 5,000-page book twice without page numbers, throwing away most of
       the duplicate pages, shuffling both copies and binding them into a
       single book. Uncovering the ancestral gene order, Kellis said,
       would be like happening upon the original book in a hidden library.
    
       The authors found the missing link by sequencing a yeast species
       whose divergence precedes the duplication. They showed that each
       region of this pre-duplication relative corresponds to exactly two
       regions of baker's yeast, providing definitive proof of
       duplication.
    
       Researchers speculate that vertebrates, including human ancestors,
       may have undergone two rounds of complete duplication, but the
       evidence remains weak without comparison to a pre-duplication
       relative. Broad researchers used a new method to compare the
       complete genomes of each of the duplicated and pre-duplication
       yeast species, and they plan to apply this method to more
       species. Typical methods of genome comparison would "miss the
       genome duplication event if they focus on solely the best match for
       every gene and every region," Kellis said.
    
       Genomic research is leading to new understanding of the connections
       between different types of genetic functions and which genes were
       paired in our ancestors to work together. For example, uncovering
       the duplication event provided a new link between gene silencing
       and the binding of DNA-replication origins. Similarly,
       understanding the dynamics of genome duplication has implications
       in understanding disease. In certain types of cancer, for instance,
       cells have twice as many chromosomes as they should, and there are
       many other diseases linked to gene dosage and
       mis-regulation. "These processes are not much different from what
       happened in yeast," Kellis said.
    
       Whole genome duplication may have allowed other organisms besides
       yeast to achieve evolutionary innovations in one giant leap instead
       of baby steps. It may account for up to 80 percent of flowering
       plants species and could explain why fish are the most diverse of
       all vertebrates. Said the authors, "The results here suggest that
       it may also be fruitful to search for similar genomic signatures of
       WGD in other organisms. It will be interesting to see just how far
       such distant echoes of genomic upheaval may be traced."
    
       Kellis is also part of the MIT Computer Science and Artificial
       Intelligence Laboratory, and Lander is a professor of biology at
       MIT.
    
       The Broad Institute, known officially as the Eli and Edythe
       L. Broad Institute, is a research collaboration of the
       Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Harvard University and
       Whitehead Institute. The Broad's mission is to fulfill the promise
       of genomics for medicine.
    
    
    
    The Scientist
    http://www.biomedcentral.com/news/20030515/01
    
       Yeasts get the vote
    
       Comparative genomics with two or more related species reveal
       limitations of single genome analysis | By Cathy Holding
    
       The Human Genome Mapping Project set out to unravel the secrets of
       the genes by determining the primary sequence of the human genome,
       but it has become clear that this information is
       insufficient. Determination of functional and coding sequences in a
       primary genome sequence depends on an a priori knowledge of gene
       function and on statistics, and so the information obtained is
       incomplete and probabilistic. In the May 15 Nature, Manolis Kellis
       and colleagues at the Whitehead Institute/Massachusetts Institute
       of Technology Center for Genome Research develop and apply a
       general approach to determining regions of significance in primary
       sequence by whole genome comparison of several related
       species. They reasoned that evolution would conserve protein coding
       and regulatory elements and that comparison of more than two
       genomes would increase the signal:noise ratio by highlighting
       changes that were not due to chance (Nature 423:241-254, 2003).
    
       Kellis et al. compared the sequences of four related species of
       yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, S. paradoxus, S. mikatae, and
       S. bayanus and employed a "voting system" to reach a conclusion on
       the validity of theoretical open reading frames (ORFs) and on the
       accuracy of the determination of proposed gene structures such as
       promoters, translation start and stop sites, and intron/exon
       boundaries. They propose to reduce the number of genes in the yeast
       gene catalogue by eliminating 503 invalid ORFs and to redefine gene
       structure assignments in at least 300 cases. They identified 188
       genes that encode small proteins of <100 amino acids and many new
       genes and regulatory elements; they were also able to infer
       functions for more than half of their 42 newly discovered sequence
       motifs by categorizing the genes associated with them. In addition,
       they found evidence for rapid genome evolution at all of the
       telomeres.
    
       "The analyses will produce a substantial revision in our knowledge
       of the yeast genome and provide strategic directions for how we
       might select other sequencing targets to advance understanding of
       the human genome," writes Steven Salzberg of The Institute for
       Genomic Research in an accompanying News and Views article. "This
       new study of yeast genomes makes it clear that comparative genome
       sequencing has tremendous analytical power," he concludes.
    
    
    
    Tufts Academic Technology First Lecture
    http://at.tccs.tufts.edu/events/past-events/58/
    
       (this link contains a video of the lecture)
       Bioinformatics Seminar Series
       Computational Biology: Challenges and Opportunity
    
       To meet Tufts University's growing interest in the field of
       bioinformatics, AT is hosting a bioinformatics seminar series
       during the spring semester. The purpose of the series is to: 1)
       educate Tufts faculty on what is bioinformatics and how to pursue
       research in this area; and 2) to create a support group interested
       in bioinformatics and pursuing research opportunities, including
       collaboration and grants support.
    
       Dr. Manolis Kellis of the MIT/Broad Institute Center for Genome
       Research will deliver the first lecture in the series. Entitled
       "Computational Biology: Challenges and Opportunity," the lecture
       will provide an overview of the range of definitions, tools, and
       skills related to the term "bioinformatics." Dr. Kellis's research
       interest is in applying computational methods to understanding
       biological signals. His MIT PhD thesis focused on the computational
       foundation of genomics. He pioneered new methods for discovering
       biological signals using multiple species comparisons.
    
       Dr. Kellis currently works at the MIT/Broad Institute Center for
       Genome Research. A collaboration between MIT, Harvard and its
       affiliated hospitals, and the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical
       Research, the Broad Institute is a newly created biomedical
       research institute, aimed a realizing the human genome to
       revolutionize clinical medicine and to make knowledge broadly
       available to scientists around the world. The Center for Genome
       Research is an international leader in the Human Genome Project
       (the effort to identify all of the DNA letters that make up the
       instructions for a human being). The Center is the largest public
       sequencing center in the world, having contributed one- third of
       the content to the human genome sequence.
    
    
    
    Museum of Science
    http://www.mos.org/doc/1434
    
       Three MIT Professors Declared "Young Innovators to Watch" at Museum
       of Science Next Generation Event
    
       BOSTON (November 10, 2004)-Last night, at the Museum of Science's
       Next Generation event, three leaders in biotechnology,
       computational biology and genetics announced their choices for the
       next generation of "young innovators to watch" in these fields.
    
       Made possible by Concord Communications, Inc. of Marlborough, MA,
       this year's event honored three young innovators from MIT. Chris
       Burge, an associate professor at MIT, was nominated by Mary Lou
       Pardue, Boris Magasanik Professor of Biology at MIT, developer of
       the fundamental geneticist's tool in-situ hybridization, and
       advocate for women in science. Burge physically split his
       laboratory to work in both the traditional "wet" and computational
       biology paradigms. His research includes RNA splicing and
       microRNAs, new developments that reveal extraordinary complexity in
       how genes work and suggest new disease mechanisms and cures.
    
       Chosen by Eric Lander, Founding Director of the Broad Institute of
       MIT and Harvard, Manolis Kellis, an assistant professor at MIT, is
       a principal investigator of the Computer Science and Artificial
       Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL), and a member of the Broad
       Institute of MIT and Harvard. He introduced new computational
       paradigms to the complex tasks of deciphering DNA signals,
       understanding gene regulation, and clarifying how genomes
       evolve. His work may help cure disease and also contribute to our
       understanding of natural history and evolution.
    
       "The Museum of Science is dedicated to presenting science,
       technology and engineering in a variety of interesting and
       inspiring formats including interactive exhibits, live
       presentations and special events like the Next Generation,"
       remarked President and Director, Ioannis (Yannis) Miaoulis. "We're
       honored to host renowned science and technology leaders and their
       chosen innovators-to celebrate their exciting discoveries and
       glimpse the future of their fields."
    
       Following a brief introduction by their mentor, each young
       innovator offered a 15-minute presentation on their work to date
       and responded to questions from the invited audience.
    
       "As a major employer in the greater Boston area, Concord
       Communications has benefited from the highly skilled local
       workforce," stated Jack Blaeser, President and CEO of Concord
       Communications. "As a company, we believe it is important to
       support the advancement of technology literacy so that
       Massachusetts can remain a vibrant contributor to the information
       economy. That is why we have chosen to become a founding sponsor of
       the Museum of Science's Technology Literacy Center. Our support for
       the Center showcases our commitment to the greater Boston
       community, in which we work and live."
    
    
    Blackwell Plant Science
    http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/PlantSci/latest/article.asp?id=86
    
       Latest News - Genetic Cross-Toc: The Homologous Genes atToc33 and
       atToc34 Contribute to Plant Development
    
       What is the function of homologous genes in organisms? This
       question is often simpler to ask than to answer.
    
       In the genetically simple plant, Arabidopsis, work is underway to
       investigate the function of homologous genes using the wealth of
       data available from the genome sequence (1,2).  In a recent paper
       in The Plant Journal, the groups of Paul Jarvis and Kenneth
       Keegstra published investigations into the function of a homologue
       of the PPI1 gene (atToc33), PPI3 (atToc34) in Arabidopsis (1).[...]
    
       Finally, it is worth noting the context of this paper.  In the
       April 8th 2004 edition of Nature, Manolis Kellis and co-workers
       reported analysis of gene function in duplicated portions of the
       yeast genome (7).  There investigations up-hold the long-standing
       hypothesis that when gene duplication occurs, one copy of the gene
       retains the original function, while the homologue diverges rapidly
       in sequence and function.  Evidence for whole-genome duplication in
       Arabidopsis neatly parallels these findings and places this paper
       on the broader evolutionary canvass.
    
          
    
    Small fish yields big insights
    http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2004/pufferfish.html
    
      An international team of scientists, including several from the
      Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, has decoded the smallest known
      vertebrate genome--the puffer fish or Tetraodon nigroviridis. The
      fish's 21 chromosomes, which together contain more than 300 million
      letters of DNA, tell a twisting evolutionary tale and even shed
      light on our own genetic makeup.
    
      Comparison with other genome sequences shows that fish proteins have
      diverged much faster than those in mammals, the team reports in the
      Oct. 21 issue of Nature. Tetraodon contains several key genes
      previously thought to be absent from fish.
    
      Further, comparison with the human genome suggests about 900
      previously unannotated human genes. Most genes in the human DNA
      sequence have two counterparts in the Tetraodon genome, the
      researchers add, showing that the ancestors of this fish must have
      undergone a genome duplication at some point. Indeed, the Tetraodon
      sequence may even give us a window on the last common ancestor of
      Tetraodon and humans--a primitive bony fish that lived hundreds of
      millions of years ago.
    
      The Broad authors are Nicole Stange-Thomann, Evan Mauceli, Manolis
      Kellis, Michael Zody, Jill Mesirov, Kerstin Lindblad-Toh, Bruce
      Birren, Chad Nusbaum and Eric Lander. Lander is also a professor in
      MIT's Department of Biology.
    
      This work was supported by the Consortium National de Recherche en
      Genomique.
    
    
       The Daily Nonpareil
    http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=11092101&BRD=2554&PAG=740&dept_id=331520&rfi=6
    
       Yeast may rise from 11,000-gene ancestor
    
       CAMBRIDGE, Mass., Mar 08, 2004 (United Press International via
       COMTEX) -- Baker's yeast may have been created when its ancestor's
       genome was doubled, giving itself twice the capacity to evolve,
       U.S. researchers said Monday.
    
       MIT and Harvard researchers studied the yeast's genetic history and
       concluded its genome may have been created when an ancestor cell
       attempted to replicate its DNA during cell division. Instead of
       splitting the DNA between the two resulting cells, one daughter
       cell may have wound up with more than 11,000 genes instead of
       5,700.
    
       Alhough the larger number of genes made the yeast cell more
       adaptable to new environments, it also created many mutations, so
       nearly all the original genes have been inactivated over time.
    
       "This is the first time we actually see that an organism underwent
       complete genome duplication and went back to single-copy state,"
       said lead author Manolis Kellis.
    
       Most of the 457 genes left in baker's yeast are devoted to one gene
       function: fermentation.
    
       Other organisms, including many flowering plants, may have
       developed the same way, the researchers said, and the same kind of
       development may also explain the diverse nature of fish.
    
       
    
    
    Nature Highlights
    http://www.nature.com/nature/links/030515/030515-4.html
    
       Comparative genomics has the potential to tackle a central problem in
       current biological research: the identification of the functional
       information in the genome. The results of one of the first major
       contributions to comparative genomics suggest that the technique is
       extremely powerful and will have a major impact on genome analysis in
       all species including humans. Draft sequences of three yeasts
       separated from Saccharomyces cerevisiae by up to 20 million years of
       evolution were compared with the gene sequence of S. cerevisiae. The
       comparison yields major revisions to the gene catalogue, including
       elimination of 500 previously annotated genes and the discovery of 50
       new ones.
    
    
    Nature News and Views
    http://www.nature.com/cgi-taf/DynaPage.taf?file=/nature/journal/v423/n6937/full/423233a_fs.html
    
       (requires subscription)
       
    
    Bio-IT World
    http://www.bio-itworld.com/archive/bases/052203.html
    
       In a tour de force of genomic technology and computational biology,
       researchers at the Whitehead/MIT Center for Genome Research have
       produced a comparative study of four strains of yeast, with dramatic
       implications for our understanding of gene inventory and regulatory
       DNA sequence motifs that direct gene expression.
       
       Manolis Kellis, Eric Lander, and colleagues sequenced the
       approximately 12-million basepair genomes of three yeast species n
       1996. Back then, sequencing a yeast genome required hundreds of
       researchers and more than a year; today, a single high-throughput
       center blasts through the sequence in about a week.
       
       Two major results emerge from this comparative genomics study. First,
       Kellis and colleagues show that more than 500 putative genes predicted
       by algorithm approaches are spurious, dropping the total number of
       yeast genes below 6,000. Second, they newly identify 42 conserved
       regulatory sequence motifs. The lessons from this study in yeast are
       directly relevant to the future study and understanding of the human
       genome.
    
    
    Diario Medico
    http://www.diariomedico.com/edicion/noticia/0,2458,297667,00.html
    http://translate.google.com/translate
    
       La comparacion de genomas de levadura identifica nuevos genes
       
       La revista Nature publica hoy el analisis comparativo de la levadura
       Saccharomyces cerevisiae con el de otras tres especies: S. paradoxus,
       S. mikatae y S. bayanus. Este mitodo ha permitido identificar la
       funcion de elementos de la secuencia hasta ahora no identificados. Los
       autores consideran que el mitodo de analisis podrma aplicarse para
       comparar el genoma humano con el de otras especies primates.
       
       Un estudio estadounidense ha realizado un analisis comparativo del
       genoma de la levadura Saccharomyces cerevisiae valiindose del
       borrador de la secuencia genitica de otras tres especies
       relacionadas, Saccharomyces paradoxus, S. mikatae y S. bayanus,
       segzn se publica hoy en Nature.
       
       Basandose en su comparacion, el equipo de Manolis Kellis, del Centro
       de Investigacion Gensmica Whitehead/MIT, en Boston (Massachusetts), ha
       llegado a la conclusion de que 500 elementos del genoma que se pensaba
       que iban a ser genes, en realidad no lo son, por lo que deberman
       eliminarse del catalogo genitico de la Saccharomyces
       cerevisiae. Asimismo, deberman aqadirse 50 nuevos genes. Finalmente,
       la S. cerevisiae se compondrma sslo de 5.538 genes que codificarman
       cien aminoacidos.
       
       La identificacion de elementos funcionales codificados en un genoma es
       uno de los principales retos de la biologia moderna. Al contrastar
       estas cuatro secuencias similares, los investigadores fueron capaces
       de identificar secuencias del ADN de la levadura que no codificaban
       genes, pero que, sin embargo, podrman tener otras funciones.
       
       El equipo se ha centrado en la Saccharomyces cerevisiae por ser uno de
       los eucariotas mas estudiados. En una primera fase del trabajo se
       alinearon los genomas y se caracterizs su evolucion, definiendo las
       regiones y sus mecanismos de cambio. Posteriormente, se desarrollaron
       mitodos para la identificacion directa de genes y elementos
       reguladores.
       
       El analisis genitico supuso una amplia revision del catalogo genitico
       de la levadura, modificando aproximadamente al 15 por ciento de los
       genes y reduciendo el nzmero total en cerca de 500. Por su parte,
       gracias al analisis se identificaron de forma automatica 72 elementos
       del genoma, incluyendo elementos reguladores ya conocidos, asm como
       otros nuevos. "Se ha intentado deducir una posible funcion para cada
       uno de estos elementos, asm como pistas sobre las interacciones entre
       ellos", han especificado los investigadores de Massachusetts.
       
       Los resultados demuestran que el analisis gensmico comparativo de
       especies relacionadas puede identificar elementos funcionales
       fundamentales previamente no conocidos. Por tanto, "la secuenciacion
       de primates podrma proporcionar muchas pistas sobre el genoma humano",
       han apuntado los cientmficos.
       
       Mitodo ztil En un artmculo de opinion que acompaqa al estudio en el
       mismo nzmero de Nature, Steven L. Salzberg, del Instituto de
       Investigacion Gensmica en Rockville (Maryland), seqala que "este nuevo
       estudio comparativo de los genomas de la levadura aclara que la
       comparacion de secuencias geniticas puede tener un tremendo potencial
       analmtico y deductivo".
       
       Segzn el genetista, "este trabajo ofrece la posibilidad de mejorar el
       conocimiento de miles de genes de una sola vez, asm como obtener datos
       sobre la funcion de una vasta cantidad de ADN gensmico que no codifica
       genes. Tal y como ya se habma demostrado cuando se secuencis, la
       levadura nos muestra una vma hacia el mejor conocimiento de nuestra
       biologia".
    
    
    Berliner Zeitung
    http://www.gene.ch/genpost/2003/Jan-Jun/msg00448.html
    
       Manolis Kellis und seine Kollegen vom Center for Genome Research in
       Cambridge, Massachusetts wdhlten f|r ihre vergleichenden Studien
       die Hefearten S. paradoxus, S. bayanus und S. mikatae aus. Wie die
       Bierhefe besitzen sie je 16 Chromosomen. Voranalysen hatten zudem
       ergeben, dass die meisten der angenommenen mehr als sechstausend
       Erbanlagen der Bierhefe ein direktes Gegenst|ck in den drei Arten
       haben. F|r rund f|nfhundert dieser Gene konnte Kellis Team
       allerdings in keiner der untersuchten Arten eine Entsprechung
       finden. Die Forscher halten es daher f|r unwahrscheinlich, dass es
       sich bei diesen Sequenzen tatsdchlich um Gene handelt -
       funktionelle Bereiche also, die den Bauplan f|r Proteine
       beinhalten. Gleichzeitig fand das Team um Kellis durch den
       Sequenzvergleich allerdings 43 neue Gene, die f|r kleine Proteine
       mit weniger als hundert Bausteinen (Aminosduren) codieren und die
       bei bisherigen Analysen |bersehen worden waren. Die Forscher
       schdtzen die Zahl der Gene im Bierhefe-Erbgut nun auf 5 726.
    
    
    
    
    Whitehead Press Release
    http://www.broad.mit.edu/media/2003/pr_03_yeast.html
    
       Whitehead Genome Center Taps Comparative Genomics to Analyze Key
       Functions in Yeast
    
       CAMBRIDGE, MA, May 14, 2003 -- In another example demonstrating the
       power of comparative genomics, scientists at the Whitehead
       Institute/MIT Center for Genome Research announce that they have
       compared four different species of baker's yeast, the simple,
       age-old organism that turns sugar to alcohol, and shown that such
       comparisons are a powerful tool for identifying key functions in
       genomes. Their findings have implications for the human genome and
       is yet another vital step on the path to further medical and
       scientific discovery. The paper appears in the May 15, 2003 issue
       of Nature.
    
       In this project, scientists generated high-quality draft sequences
       of the genomes of three of the Saccharomyces yeast species,
       S. paradoxus, S. mikatae and S. bayanus. They lined up these
       genomes to that of the model organism S. cerevisiae, commonly known
       as baker's yeast. The resulting multiple comparisons provided a
       great resource for understanding the yeast genome.
    
       Highly significant is that the comparisons made it possible to more
       easily distinguish the "noise'' portions of the genomes--areas that
       appear to have little use-- from "signal," those parts that have an
       obvious purpose. In humans, a mere five percent of the genome is
       functional.
    
       "The goal is to extract important biological signals hidden in the
       vast noise of non-functional regions," says Manolis Kellis
       (Kamvysselis), a graduate student at the Whitehead/MIT Center for
       Genome Research and the Department of Computer Science,
       Massachusetts Institute of Technology, who is the first author on
       the paper. "These signals include genes, the building blocks of our
       cells, but also regulatory motifs, tiny traffic lights that turn
       genes on and off."
    
       Not unlike attempting separating wheat from chaff with only one's
       fingers, extracting signal in genomes has proved a painstaking,
       inaccurate process, and a frustrating one, as being able to hone in
       on the functions of a genome has vast implications for medical
       science. Yeast, a relatively simple organism, has a small, compact
       genome containing less noise than the human genome. It provided an
       excellent organism to test comparative genomic techniques.
    
       "We believe it is a good model for genome-wide comparative
       analysis,'' Kellis says. In principal, the approach the researchers
       used can be applied to any organism by choosing a set of related
       species to sequence and study.
    
       Overall, the scientists found their model to be a powerful tool for
       identifying genes and refining gene structure, rapid and slow
       evolutionary changes, and facets of gene regulation.
    
       "Comparative genomics is an extremely important tool. Trying to
       understand an ancient language like Egyptian hieroglyphs by simply
       looking at the words in one language may be hard. But by reading
       the same text in other languages like Latin or Greek and finding
       common structures, we can recognize words and grammar, and learn
       the meaning of each language. Similarly, by reading the same
       chapter in multiple species, we get to the basis of what is
       important in the book of life. Comparative genomics is the Rosetta
       stone of biology," says Kellis.
    
       Saccharomyces is perhaps best known as the magic that makes bread
       rise and fruit ferment but to scientists, it is a favorite organism
       of study, one that for years has helped scientists answer important
       questions in genetics and cell biology. Now, the availability of
       the three, high-quality yeast sequences means biomedical
       researchers can better understand these organisms, some of which
       mutate into invasive, deadly infections in humans.
    
       Among the findings of this analysis is that the yeast genomes hold
       about 5,700 genes, many fewer than the estimated 10,000 of the
       fruitfly and 30,000 that humans have. Because of an ancient common
       ancestor, humans have about 2-3,000 genes in common with the yeast,
       generally genes that code for basic cell machinery.
    
       Researchers were also able to identify signals controlling gene
       expression that typically required complex experimentation and
       extensive biological knowledge to find. "One of the most important
       results of this analysis is that regulatory motifs can be read
       directly from the DNA sequence," says Kellis. "When comparing
       multiple genomes, these signals become apparent. We now have a
       complete list of the most strongly conserved regulatory motifs in
       yeast."
    
       The four different species of yeast are as different from each
       other as mice are from humans, yet across the four yeast genomes,
       all but roughly 12 genes are held in common. In other words, a mere
       12 genes or so separate one yeast species from the next.
    
       "It is striking. We saw the same thing between the human and mouse
       genomes. It may mean that genetic differentiation across different
       species is the result of very subtle events," Kellis says.
    
       Understanding what changes may turn a benign species into an
       invasive human pathogen will be crucial to understanding and curing
       disease. Studying the differences between Saccharomyces genomes
       offers insight as to how genes and new functions may evolve in
       higher organisms, including humans. "We found a small number of
       genes that are evolving very rapidly," says Kellis. "These are
       likely to be involved in speciation events."
    
       The genomes were sequenced using the Whole Genome Shotgun (WGS)
       approach. For each species, sequence from the entire genome was
       generated and reassembled by recognizing identical segments using
       the ARACHNE assembler, a program developed at the Whitehead
       Institute/MIT Genome Center. The WGS method is standard and has
       been successfully applied to the fruitfly and the mouse. The
       Saccharomyces sequences are freely available through public
       sequence databases and the Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD)
       maintained at Stanford University. The sequence is still considered
       a draft because there are very small missing or ambiguous portions
       of the sequence.
    
       The genome of each species of Saccharomyces is about 12 million
       base pairs in size. The draft sequences show the order of the DNA
       chemical bases A, T, C, and G along the yeasts' 16 chromosomes. It
       includes more than 95 percent of the genomes with long, continuous
       stretches of overlapping DNA and represents 7-fold coverage of the
       genome. This means that the location of every base, or DNA letter,
       in the Saccharomyces genomes was determined an average of 7 times,
       a frequency that assures a high degree of accuracy.
    
       Today's research also represents a major step along the path of
       bioinformatics, a recent field of science that combines biology
       with computing--as not one test tube was used beyond the sequencing
       of the species. The project relied completely on computational
       analysis.
    
       "We are entering a new era where computers will provide a bigger
       and bigger role to the understanding of biology and genomics,''
       Kellis commented.
    
       The Whitehead Institute/MIT Center for Genome Research is an
       international leader in the field of genomics, the study of all of
       the genes in an organism and how they function together in health
       and disease. A flagship of the Human Genome Project, the Center
       today houses a broad range of thriving research programs combining
       structural genomics, medical and population genetics and clinical
       medicine. The Center's annual budget is $80 million, and it employs
       350 people, including scientists and medical researchers from
       Whitehead, MIT and Harvard.
    
    
    
    
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute
    http://www.hhmi.org/biointeractive/genomics/kamvysselis.html
    
       When Manolis Kellis was 12 years old, he and his family moved
       from Athens to a small town in southern France. "My dad just woke
       up one morning and said, 'Let's go.'" His father, who grew up in a
       village in Greece, wanted his children to be bilingual-a skill he
       regretted never having gained himself. So they hit the road. "We
       didn't ask questions. We just went," says Kellis, who is now a
       graduate student working with Eric Lander at the Whitehead
       Institute/MIT Center for Genome Research. "Four months later, we
       were living in France."
    
       The move changed Kellis's life. "In a new language and new
       environment I had to work really hard," he says. "And I learned
       that working hard is normal."
    
       It also gave him a unique and intimate appreciation of
       mathematics. "Learning a new language, I was able to step back and
       realize that words are just placeholders for meanings. They're
       abstractions." And the same is true in math-a discipline that is
       all about abstraction. "Terms like x and y have no meaning on their
       own," notes Kellis. "They are placeholders for other
       information."
    
       Four years after the move to France, Kellis was one of the top
       100 students in the country. "People said, 'Oh, he's good at math
       because he's Greek,'" Kellis laughs. "But really it was
       because I had to overcome the language barrier."
    
       Although Kellis loved math, he yearned to find a practical
       application for his skills. So, after having learned English as a
       foreign language in high school, he enrolled as a computer science
       major at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. There he
       learned to use computers to tackle a variety of problems: solving
       geometric surfaces in multiple dimensions, building models for
       human motion, and programming robots to cooperate by following
       simple rules, like ants in a colony. "I worked on a different
       problem every six months," says Kellis. Taking on diverse
       tasks taught him how to absorb knowledge, adapt quickly to new
       situations, and use his talents to do something novel.
    
       That was excellent training for the work Kellis now does with
       Lander, where he applies his skills as computer scientist and
       mathematician to learn something new about how cells work. "From an
       engineer's perspective, looking at life and how life works really
       makes sense," he says. After all, a cell is like a robot that
       evolution has designed and assembled. The information encoded in
       its DNA is like the program that runs the machine. And Kellis
       is working on cracking the code that cells use to live-and to
       evolve.
    
       Working with Lander and his colleagues at the Whitehead Institute,
       Kellis is comparing the genome sequences of four different
       species of Saccharomyces, a budding yeast that bakers and brewers
       have used in bread and beer for centuries. Using computer programs
       that he wrote himself, Kellis is searching these yeast genomes
       for patterns. He is specifically looking for short signals that are
       distributed nonrandomly throughout the DNA. Sequences that are
       biologically important to the survival of an organism, the
       researchers theorize, will be conserved by evolution. They will
       look the same and crop up in the same places in the genomes of
       different organisms-in this case, closely related species of yeast.
    
       So far the data look good. Kellis and company are finding
       patterns and identifying elements that appear again and again
       throughout the yeast genomes. Now the researchers are working on
       correlating these signals with their functions to understand how
       they regulate gene expression and enable genes to work together to
       build and operate a machine as dynamic as a living cell.
    
       To tease patterns from these genomes, Kellis has written
       thousands of lines of computer code. His days are a continuous loop
       of looking at data, writing programs for probing the data, and
       testing new ideas. "Work, observe, work, observe, work, observe,"
       as Kellis puts it.
    
       Much of his work is actually done at home, where Kellis
       shuffles from bed to computer and back again-with occasional trips
       to the refrigerator. "The danger of working independently at home
       is that you'll make more trips to the fridge than you'll write
       lines of code," he says. Of course it also has its advantages. "You
       can sleep late if you worked too hard or partied too hard the night
       before," says Kellis. "Or you can go to the beach if it's
       sunny on a Thursday but rainy on Saturday." But then, it's back to
       work-which is fine with Kellis. "Doing a Ph.D. takes a lot of
       self-motivation and you have to love what you do," he
       explains. "But I love what I do. It's like I'm a kid still playing
       with toys. They're just different toys."
    
       Kellis is finishing his second year of graduate school, and if
       all goes well he hopes to graduate in a year or so. As for the
       future, Kellis is still undecided. He might want to teach, or
       do postdoctoral work, or maybe go out and do something totally
       new. Until then, he will certainly continue to work hard-and play
       hard, too. When he's not in the lab, Kellis enjoys getting
       physical: biking, in-line skating, or salsa dancing. "Being stuck
       in a chair all the time, my hobbies involve getting out and working
       my body," he says. "It's important to try to find some balance. I'm
       not just a brain."
    
    
    
    
    
    ============================================================
    
    Awards: 
    
    
    First recipient of Paris Kanellakis Fellowship
    http://www.eecs.mit.edu/AY98-99/announcements/9.html
    
       Manolis Kamvysselis awarded Kanellakis Fellowship at MIT
       May 28, 1999
    
       The Department is pleased to announce that Mr. Manolis Kamvysselis
       has been chosen to receive the first Paris Kanellakis Fellowship at
       MIT. Mr. Kamvysselis came to MIT as a freshman in 1995, expects to
       complete his Master of Engineering Degree in June, 1999, and plans
       to continue in the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory working on
       his PhD.
    
       The Kanellakis Fellowship was established at MIT by General and
       Mrs. Eleftherios Kanellakis in memory of their son Paris who
       received his PhD from EECS in 1982 and died unexpectedly and
       tragically in 1995. The family has established two similar
       fellowships at Brown University where Paris was a member of the
       computer science faculty. Brown University has established a web
       page in recognition of these Fellowships:
       http://www.cs.brown.edu/grad/pck_fellowship.html.
    
       
    MIT EECS - 2003 Sprowls Doctoral Dissertation Award
    http://www.lcs.mit.edu/about/awards.php3
    
       Manolis Kamvysselis and Dina Katabi receive the Sprowls
       Dissertation Award.  The award honors the best thesis in the field
       of computer science, from any department at MIT.  Both graduate
       from the department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.
    
    
    Tau Beta Pi Intercollegiate Design Competition
    http://www-tech.mit.edu/V117/N17/tbp.17n.html
    
       For the fourth straight year, MIT won the Tau Beta Pi National
       Engineering Honor Society district design competition on Saturday,
       beating out approximately 17 regional competitors, including Yale
       University, Brown University, Boston University, and Worcester
       Polytechnic Institute.
    
       The team of William H. Stadtlander '99, Matthew S. Duplessie '99,
       and Manolis E. I. Kamvysselis '99 captured the $300 first-place
       prize. The contest was part of the activities at the annual TBP
       District Convention held at the Worcester Polytechnic Institute
       this year.
    
       Teams designed airplane carts
    
       The team was challenged to design an airline cart that would
       alleviate the problem of stewards suffering back injuries while
       serving drinks to passengers. They were given four hours to prepare
       the design and a 10-minute presentation.
    
       Their idea consisted of a motorized cart that ran on a rubber
       mat. The mat had two grooved tracks to fit the cart's grooved
       wheels. The team decided to use a rubber mat so grooves would not
       be cut directly into the floor of the plane. The grooved track and
       wheels also prevented the cart from moving during turbulence.
    
       Many of the competing teams developed similar motorized-cart
       designs. The MIT team considered many other options, from using
       tubing to deliver drinks to the passengers to using a spring-based
       system to hang a cart from the cabin ceiling.
    
       "They really didn't give us a lot of specifications," Stadtlander
       said.
    
       The design problem "very open-ended" and wished the contest could
       have "allowed more creativity," so that the competing teams' "ideas
       could have been very different," Duplessie said.
    
       Brainstorming was key to success
    
       As in the local competition, the team used brainstorming and math
       to win. They "spent a large amount of time brainstorming to iron
       out the kinks in the plan," Duplessie said.
    
       They also backed up their design with dimensions and a cost
       analysis. "We did a significant bit of math," Duplessie said.
    
       Outfitting a 30-foot airplane with one aisle was estimated to cost
       about $5,000, Stadtlander said.
    
       The team also made sure to polish their presentation, since half
       their score was based on presentation and half was based on
       design. "You can come up with a great idea that works, but if you
       can't present it, it's worthless," Stadtlander said.
    
       The team enjoyed the competition. "I would recommend it to any
       freshman or sophomore next year," Duplessie said.
    
    ============================================================
    
    Social:
    
    
    
    MIT International Celebration
    http://www-tech.mit.edu/V117/N22/ifair.22n.html
    
      "I-Fair has always been the most important event for ISA, just as
      much as it is for many international clubs on campus. It's by far
      the largest event, and it really fulfills the goal of ISA, which is
      to bring closer together the different cultures represented in MIT,"
      said Manolis E.I. Kamvysselis '99, president of ISA.
    
      "I-Fair was a huge success this year. It's been the biggest I-Fair
      we've had so far," Kamvysselis said. About 2,000 people dropped by
      the event, and over 118 countries were represented. A record number
      of 43 clubs hosted booths and 27 groups put on performances, he
      said.
    
      "I think it was flawless this year; the spirit was there. The people
      love it because they see many clubs; clubs love it because they get
      a chance to perform," Kamvysselis said.
    
      "The I-Fair is a great opportunity for the clubs at MIT to display
      their traditional cultures through dance, food, and music. This
      year's show went really well, we had a lot of people who came who
      aren't from MIT, such as Harvard [University] and Boston College,"
      said Manas D. Ratha '99, treasurer of the ISA.
    
      While some expressed concern about the chilly weather, it was not
      enough to the keep people from turning out for the fair. "The
      weather could have been a bit warmer and sunnier, but it cooperated
      quite well, considering" that weather services had forecasted rain
      that day,Kamvysselis said.
    
      Besides the spring I-Fair, ISAalso hosts a "mini I-Fair" in the
      fall, but "we don't want to make it as big as I-Fair. I-Fair
      originated in the spring, when the good weather begins; it's sunny,
      and people have more time to perform," Kamvysselis said.
    
      "I-Fair is an event unique in the life of MITstudents. It's the one
      and only event that brings together so many students from so many
      different backgrounds and interests and lets them participate
      actively in the event, [giving] them a chance to show a bit of
      themselves to such a wide and diverse public," Kamvysselis said.
    
    ============================================================
    
    
    Implementation of exon/intron evolution: 
    http://pages.cpsc.ucalgary.ca/~gaoj/research/courses/biocomp/
    
      In computer science, evolutionary computation is an important
      computational paradigm that comes from the nature. It tries to use
      evolution mechanisms existing in the nature to solve computer
      problems. Therefore new discoveries and hypothesis on the natural
      evolution could give new ideas to evolutionary computation.
    
      According to the known facts, in creatures' DNAs there are large
      quantities of genes that are not ``translated'' by the creatures
      into the phenotypes, and they are sometimes called ``garbage
      genes''. But most people, including me, think they are not garbages
      at all. Their functions are simply unknown currently. So many people
      use the term introns to refer to such function-unknown genes instead
      of ``garbages''. Correspondingly, the known genes are called
      exons. Many hypothesis are made on these introns. People think they
      could be meta data of the exons, or the records of the whole
      evolution histroy[Kam].
    
      In January, a paper in Nature with the title Loss and Recovery of
      Wings in Stick Insects[WBM03] reported a new discovery in evolution
      -- some species can lose a complex organ and get it back some time
      later. This phenomenon may happen for several times during the
      evolution. It amazes scientists a lot because it reveals a fact that
      some complex functions of a species can be temporarily disabled and
      latent in the genes and be triggered by the environment again some
      generations later to come back to the species.
    
      This discovery interests me greatly. Associating the introns facts
      and the phenomenon revealed by the paper, I come to the hypothesis
      that these genes are turned from exons into introns -- thus disabled
      temporarily and still in the genes, and later turned from introns
      back to exons -- enabled again. It seems that such a mechanism can
      probably increase the adaptability of creatures, especially in an
      ever-changing environment.
    
      A natural thought is to test whether such a mechanism can result in
      increase of adaptability in evolutionary computation. Therefore my
      idea for this project comes into being -- a Genetic Programming with
      introns and exons.
    
      In this report I explain the experiments on the Genetic Programming
      with introns and exons, and show the results I got: Section 2
      presents the problem selected for the Genetic Programming to solve;
      the implementation is discussed in Section 3; Section 4 explains the
      experiments I made, as well as the results I got from the
      experiments; finally in Section 5 and 6, the report is concluded and
      future work is indicated.