MIT Computational Biology Group - Funding

We have received generous support from the NIH (National Human Genome Research Institute and National Cancer Institute), the NSF (DBI program, DEB program), the Sloan Foundation, MIT, the Broad Institute, the Human Frontiers Science Program, EMBO, the Shering Foundation, the Paris Kanellakis fellowship, and Portugal.

Federal Support

Regulatory motif discovery in the human genome using comparative genomics
NIH 1R01HG004037-01A1 (PI: Kellis)
10/01/07-09/31/121 (Sum)

To realize the promise of the human genome project, we need not only the parts list of all the genes, but also a comprehensive understanding of how they function together. Along with genes, our genome contains all the signals necessary for controlling gene expression in response to environmental and developmental stimuli. These regulatory processes are governed by short sequence motifs, responsible for modulating gene usage at every level. Despite their prevalence, regulatory motifs have been particularly challenging to identify, due to their short length and the varying distances at which they can act. Given their extraordinary importance, their systematic understanding still remains one of the major challenges of modern biology.

In the proposed work, we use comparative genomics of multiple mammals to systematically identify and characterize regulatory motifs in the human genome based on their evolutionary conservation. We have pioneered a new powerful approach for de novo motif discovery by using genome-wide conservation, and successfully applied it in four yeast genomes, twelve fly genomes, and human promoters and 3'-UTRs. Here we expand this methodology to undertake motif discovery across the entire human genome: (1) we develop methods that use dozens of mammalian species for motif discovery and characterization; (2) we identify significant motif combinations and grammars and reveal their functional roles; and (3) we discover functional regions of motif clustering and study motif role in specifying enhancer function.

The proposed work is timely, given that NHGRI's sequencing efforts now encompass more than 30 mammalian genomes, specifically for understanding the human. Moreover, large-scale systematic experimentation is providing the functional information necessary to inform and validate our findings. By revealing the underlying sequence patterns that govern gene usage, we complement these ongoing efforts and provide access to the concrete building blocks of human gene regulation. This will enable researchers world-wide to link new genes in pathways by their co-regulation, elucidate the role of non- coding SNPs in regulatory diseases, and lead to new tests and therapeutics for modern medicine. A global map of regulatory motifs constitutes a necessary knowledge infrastructure towards a comprehensive understanding of regulation, development, and disease.



CAREER: Comparative Genomics and Biological Signal Discovery in the Human Genome
NSF DBI 0644282 (PI: Kellis)
10/01/07-09/31/121 (Sum)

Massachusetts Institute of Technology researcher Manolis Kellis is awarded a Faculty Early Career Development award to develop comparative genomics methods that can maximally use mammalian sequences for biological signal discovery and to systematically interpret the human genome. In Aim 1 comparative methods for ortholog identification will be developed that can scale to dozens of complete mammals, can account for the complex phylogenies relating them, gene duplication and loss, and varying rates of divergence across gene families, and across species. In a second aim a classification framework for gene identification will be constructed. Beyond the simple use of comparative genomics to recognize conserved regions, evolutionary signatures will be defined specific to protein-coding regions, based on patterns of insertion and deletion, codon mutational biases, and motif abundance in proximity of exons. Finally, phylogenetically-informed tools for motif discovery and enhancer identification will be developed. The study of rates of motif gain and loss will allow them to derive parameters for every lineage based on the information content of each motif. These parameters will then be used to discover motifs at the genome scale, tolerating motif movement and loss, based on a likelihood ratio of motif conservation over a branch length within a given window of tolerated movement. Further research will develop methods for identifying functional motif combinations, and use these to identify regions of motif clustering, and relate them with experimentally identified enhancer elements and other regions of regulatory importance.

Functional information of expression, regulator binding, and chromatin structure from human tissues and cell lines, across the entire genome and in selected ENCODE regions, will provide training data for our methods, and validate datasets for the predictions. Two key model organisms will be the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, which provide unique models for the computational and experimental efforts. Both benefit from large phylogenetic trees with many completely sequenced relatives, compact genomes, and extensive experimental information, which can inform the power of the methods. The ability to work with multiple model organisms will allows the study of each aspect of human biology at the appropriate scale of complexity, from yeast, to fly, mouse, and human, by virtue of the early shared ancestry of our common biology. The education plan involves developing new courses and curricula and a computational biology textbook. The tools produced by the project will be distributed freely. Already strong efforts to include underrepresented groups will continue along outreach activities, such as lectures at museums or working with high school teachers in the Boston area



Integrative analysis of genomic and epigenomic datasets in multiple cell types
NIH 1-RC1-HG005334-01 (PI: Kellis)
09/30/09-09/29/111 (Acad)

This application addresses broad Challenge Area (08) Genomics, and specific Challenge Topic, 08-OD-101, Computational approaches for epigenomic analysis. While the primary DNA sequence of the human genome is ultimately responsible for the encoding and functioning of each cell, a plethora of chromatin and DNA modifications have been described in recent years that can modulate the interpretation of this primary sequence. These epigenetic modifications lead to the diversity of function across different human cell types, and play key roles in the establishment and maintenance of cellular identity during development, and also in health and disease. The human ENCODE project, the NIH Epigenome Roadmap, and several other large-scale experimental efforts are currently underway to map dozens of histone and DNA modifications across multiple human cell types and disease states, generating a diversity of rich epigenomic datasets. This creates a pressing need for the development of rigorous computational methods for the systematic integrative analysis of epigenomic datasets, and for understanding their relationship to other genomic datasets, including gene expression, disease association, and phenotypic profiling.

In this proposal, we will develop and apply graphical probabilistic models for describing chromatin modifications, based on multivariate hidden Markov models. We will use these models to discover the set of underlying chromatin state, based on recurrent combinations of epigenetic marks across the entire genome (Aim 1). We will validate and functionally characterize these states based on their enrichments and positional biases with respect to existing functional elements, as well as large-scale gene expression and disease association datasets (Aim 2). Lastly, we will extend these methods to study dynamics of chromatin state across both healthy and disease cell types, and study how these correlate with functional differences between the observed cell types (Aim 3). We will work closely with the scientists involved in data production and facilitate communication and data integration across them, and also with data analysis and coordination centers already established to facilitate sharing of methods and results across the ENCODE and Epigenome Roadmap consortia, and with the larger community.

Overall, the proposed integrative analysis of large-scale genomic and epigenomic datasets will provide a unified view of current and planned epigenomic datasets, towards a systematic understanding of gene and genome regulation in health and disease. While the primary DNA sequence of the human genome is ultimately responsible for the encoding and functioning of each cell, a plethora of chromatin and DNA modifications have been described in recent years that can modulate the interpretation of this primary sequence, leading to the diversity of function across different human cell types. This project will create a computational framework and resource to integrate large-scale genomic and epigenomic datasets, to understand their functional role in health and disease, and to understand their dynamics across different cell lines and disease states. The knowledge gained can play key roles in understanding the establishment and maintenance of cellular identity during healthy development, and how dysregulation of these processes can lead to the onset of disease.



A Data Analysis Center for integration of fly and worm modENCODE datasets
NIH 1-RC2-HG005639-01 (PI: Kellis)
09/30/09-09/29/111 (Acad)

The aims of the ENCODE (Encyclopedia of DNA Elements) and modENCODE (model organism ENCODE) projects are to apply high-throughput, cost-efficient approaches to generate a catalog of functional elements in the human, worm, and fly genomes, which will serve as the basis for biomedical research advances. By their smaller genome size, powerful genetics, and ease of experimentation, D. melanogaster and C. elegans can help guide the study of functional elements in the human genome, reveal new insights into global gene regulation and embryo development, and enable experimental studies of gene function and regulation which are not accessible in mammalian systems.

This proposal aims to enhance the value of these datasets by creating a Data Analysis Center (DAC) to support, facilitate, and enhance integrative analyses of the modENCODE consortium in fly and worm, to achieve a high-resolution annotation of all their functional elements, and to reveal new insights into the biology and gene regulation of animal genomes including the human. We foresee four central roles for the DAC, and have organized our aims around them. Aim 1: We will provide common computational guidelines for data processing in fly and worm, a common computational infrastructure and pipeline for common analysis and statistical tasks. Aim 2: We will facilitate and carry out element-specific integrative analyses to identify diverse classes of functional elements based on combinations of relevant datasets coming from multiple groups. This includes (a) enhancers, promoters, insulators, and other regions of regulatory importance, (b) protein-coding and non-coding genes, (c) regulatory networks of transcription factor and microRNA targeting, and (d) sequence features predictive of diverse classes of functional elements. Aim 3: We will carry out exploratory data analyses across different data types to discover potentially novel correlations and insights relating diverse classes of elements. In particular we will apply dimensionality reduction techniques to coordinate-based genome-wide genomic and epigenomic datasets, we will apply clustering and bi-clustering methods to identify functionally related sets of genes and modules, and we will analyze structural and dynamic properties of discovered networks. Aim 4: We will carry out comparative analyses across the two model organisms, and also with yeast and human. We will provide an ortholog resource between the species, compare regulatory relationships and dynamics for orthologous cell lines and developmental points, and carry over biological knowledge across model organisms and human.

To achieve these four aims, we will work closely with members of the consortium, the modENCODE Analysis Working Group (AWG), consisting of all Principal Investigators and analysis groups, and the Data Coordination Center (DCC), responsible for all data sharing within the consortium and with the larger worm and fly communities. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: The aims of the ENCODE (Encyclopedia of DNA Elements) and modENCODE (model organism ENCODE) projects are to apply high-throughput, cost-efficient approaches to generate a catalog of functional elements in the human, worm, and fly genomes, which will serve as the basis for biomedical research advances. By their smaller genome size, powerful genetics, and ease of experimentation, D. melanogaster and C. elegans can help guide the study of functional elements in the human genome, reveal new insights into global gene regulation and embryo development, and enable experimental studies of gene function and regulation which are not accessible in mammalian systems. This proposal aims to enhance the value of these datasets by creating a Data Analysis Center (DAC) to support, facilitate, and enhance integrative analyses of the modENCODE consortium in fly and worm, to achieve a high-resolution annotation of all their functional elements, and to reveal new insights into the biology and gene regulation of animal genomes including the human.

Co-PIs: Gerstein, Park, Liu, Gunsalus, Brenner, Bickel, Lai, MacAlpine, Henikoff


Genome-wide chromatin modification targeting by endogenous small RNAs
NIH 1-RC1-CA147187-01 (PI: Hart)
09/30/09-09/29/110.3 (Acad)

This application addresses broad Challenge Area (08) Genomics, and specific Challenge Topic 08-CA-104: Regulatory functions of small RNAs. Our goal is to identify small RNAs (smRNAs) as regulators of histone modifying enzymes, mediating interactions with promoters and/or non-coding RNAs present in promoter proximal regions and mediating long-term effects on gene expression. This is a novel model that would tie together genome-encoded small RNAs, non-coding RNAs, and the regulation of histone modifications, leading to long-term modulation of gene expression. Epigenetic modifications are inheritable alterations to the genome in the form of enzymatic manipulations of key histone residues, or the methylation of specific cytosines in the DNA sequence. Carcinogenesis is likely to include aberrant use of this pathway to cause long-term changes in gene expression in transformed cells. In fact, epigenetic dysregulation is a hallmark of numerous cancers, and compounds which broadly affect histone modifications are under intense scrutiny as cancer therapies. While this strategy may be effective, we believe that it will be possible to therapeutically target epigenetic modulation of selected genes by exploiting the existing RNAi machinery, as demonstrated for several smRNAs and genes. This project aims to understand the relationship between small, non-coding RNA sequences and epigenetic histone modifications, and explore the mechanisms by which epigenome-modifying complexes may be recruited by small RNAs to their target DNA sequences. Comparison of smRNAs identified in human embryonic stem cells by deep sequencing with genomic alignment sites and previously published epigenomic data of key histone modifications has identified striking association between these two previously independent pathways.

In this proposal we will test the hypothesis that smRNAs mediate the placement of epigenetic marks. Specifically, we will (1) identify and characterize classes of smRNA sequences associated with specific chromatin modifications in human ES Cells during neural differentiation; (2) bioinformatically predict as yet unobserved smRNA-mediated epigenetic effects; and (3) experimentally confirm the functional interaction between small non-coding RNAs and epigenetic modifications in hESC. Epigenetic marking is one of the next great questions in biology and medicine. We propose that endogenous smRNAs are the key link between histone modification mechanisms and individual genomic loci. If smRNAs do in fact direct epigenetic modifications, this may represent a novel mechanism by which cells are capable of transcriptional regulation. This will provide both additional therapeutic targets and enhanced understanding of disease etiologies for regions of altered histone modification during cancers.

Public health relevance: Epigenetic dysregulation is a hallmark of several human disorders and numerous cancers. Histone modifications represent one mechanism of epigenetic regulation that directly affects the transcriptional availability of adjacent genomic elements. This project aims to identify the relationship between small, non-coding RNA sequences and epigenetic histone modifications, and explore the mechanisms by which epigenome modifying complexes may be recruited by small RNAs to their target genomic regions. The association of small RNAs with specific histone modifications provides understanding of disease etiologies and suggests mechanisms to transcriptionally regulate target genes in patients.

Co-PI: Kellis


High-throughput sequencing of chromatin regulatory elements
NIH 1 U54 HG004570-01 (PI: Bernstein)
09/30/07-09/30/110.3 (Sum)

A key goal in characterizing the human genome is to acquire a complete catalog of chromatin regulatory elements and sequence determinants of chromatin state. In this application, we propose to undertake a large-scale project to map the genomewide locations of >35 histone modifications and related proteins in >20 human cell types by coupling chromatin IP with massive-throughput sequencing on the Solexa platform. Our preliminary data demonstrate that this approach is highly accurate and a major advance over existing technologies in terms of cell requirements, genome coverage, throughput and cost-effectiveness.

A sequencing pipeline will be applied to generate more than 500 genomewide datasets of chromatin structure by sequencing >1000 samples. A computational pipeline will then convert the sequencing reads into high resolution, genomewide maps that can be visualized in genome browsers and used for downstream analysis. Comparative genomic analysis and motif-finding tools will be applied to classify genomic sites based on associated chromatin structures and to identify underlying sequence determinants. Cell and molecular biology methods will be used to validate inferred functions for a representative subset of discovered elements. Chromatin regulation is extensively implicated in many aspects of human development and disease. In particular, cancer cells may universally exhibit aberrant chromatin states.

The proposed systematic identification and characterization of chromatin regulatory elements in the human genome will offer unprecedented insight into the structure and function of chromatin, and provide an invaluable resource for investigators in chromatin, genomics, cancer and many other fields of research. All data collected in the context of the proposed project will be made available pre-publication to the greater scientific community once reliability has been confirmed.

Co-PI: Kellis.


A Cis-Regulatory Map of the Drosphilia Genome
NIH 1U01 HG004264-01 (PI: White)
03/01/07-03/28/110.3 (Sum)

Drosophila presents an ideal model organism for the study of human cis-regulation. Its genome shares the structure and major features of the human genome; all major families of transcription factors, both the basal machinery and site-specific factors; the overall regulatory structure of developmental genes such as the Hox clusters; many of the "master regulatory" transcription factor proteins such as PAX6/eyeless and Distalless that control organ or tissue identity. In many cases, human proteins function in Drosophila just as well as Drosophila proteins. In addition to the shared biology, the fly also offers powerful experimental tools not yet available for mammalian species. Its small genome size, at 130 Mb, is amenable to genome-wide systematic experimentation at a resolution not yet achievable in the human. Additionally, a total of 12 fully sequenced species provide one of the richest comparative genomic datasets, powerful enough to identify individual functional binding sites of regulators across the entire genome. Finally, the wealth of high throughput experimental techniques enables us to validate functional predictions in vivo.

In this proposal, we exploit these unique features to produce a comprehensive cis-regulatory map of the Drosophila genome, using a combined experimental and computational approach. We will identify fly promoter regions, short and long range enhancers, insulator and repressor regions, and their defining characteristics based on cis-regulatory motifs and grammars, chromatin state, and transcription factor binding.

This project serves as a pilot for the full-scale mapping of functional regulatory elements in the human genome. The methods and strategies developed will be crucial for informing the human genome. In addition, the body of knowledge gained will be invaluable in the understanding of many human diseases and disorders due to regulatory malfunction of gene regulation. Drosophila is an ideal model system for this project, for its compact genome size, experimental resources, and comparative genomics power, while retaining all the major characteristics of the human genome for the study of gene regulation.

Co-PIs: Kellis, Ren, Posakony, Bellen


Integrated human genome annotation: generation of a reference gene set
NIH U54 HG004555-01 - (PI: Hubbard)
09/30/07-09/30/110.3 (Sum)

The specific aim of this proposal is to annotate all the evidence-based gene features at high accuracy on the human genome reference sequence. This includes identifying all the protein-coding loci with associated alternative variants, non-coding loci which have transcript evidence available in the public nucleotide database (NCBI/EMBL/DDBJ) and pseudogenes.

To achieve this goal we will integrate computational approaches, including recent comparative methods, expert manual annotation, able to integrate literature information, and targeted experimental approaches. Based on the exhaustive experimental and computation investigation of our initial GENCODE annotation of the ENCODE regions we are confident that we can deliver a gene set with high specificity and sensitivity that will provide critical information to other biologists and other ENCODE groups. As part of this process we will label all apparent gene loci clearly, classifying them according to their likely current functional status, so users are informed where regions that appear gene like are most likely pseudogenes or where transcript evidence is most likely artefactual. There are a number of motivated groups working in the area of defining protein coding genes for the human genome. This proposal includes most such groups and coordinates with other key groups. Critically, all the groups bring extensive experience of data integration and evaluation, leading to the resolution of annotation discrepancies by multiple approaches. This gives us confidence that through this integrated project we will be able to eliminate many of the remaining uncertainties about the precise location of genes and their component exons and transcript structure in the human genome.

Genome-wide, highly accurate transcript definition will be of enormous value to the myriad of researchers working on the human genome. It will both have large cost savings worldwide due to increased specificity of reagent design and provide a more complete view of human genes, in particular those associated with disease. From this foundation, more accurate descriptions of the genetic causes of disease can be discovered.

Co-PIs: Kellis, Gerstein, Reymond, Guigo, Haussler, Brent, Valencia.


Assembling the Tree of Life: Can Phylogenomcis Resolve Deep Phylogeny
NSF DEB 0936234 - (PI: Alm)
09/1/09-8/31/13

Resolving the topology and relative timing of the deepest branches remains one of the most significant challenges in Assembling the Tree of Life. Knowledge of this deep phylogeny, however, is critical for understanding foundational questions in biology such as how the complex networks that underlie modern life arose, and how they have been shaped by co-evolution with the Earth.

This research project will develop new algorithms to infer a Tree of Life that is based on the thousands of complete genome sequences currently available rather than a single gene or small set of genes. Accurately identifying and accounting for horizontal gene transfer, a process in which genes are exchanged between unrelated species, potentially obscuring phylogenetic relationships, is a key challenge that will be addressed. Calibrating the timing of the deepest branches on the Tree of Life with the geological record will be done in collaboration with experts in early Earth history and geochronology.

This project will result in a better understanding of the origin and history of life on Earth, and new algorithms for inferring the evolutionary history of genes and species across billions of years of evolutionary time. The project will bring together expertise from diverse fields of study, and expose graduate, undergraduate, and postdoctoral students to interdisciplinary research. In addition, museum partnerships and podcasts will enable dissemination of research results to the general public.

Co-PI: Kellis.


Foundation Support and Chair Appointments

We are also supported by the following appointments for Prof Kellis:
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Award
2008-2011, discretionary funds.

Karl Van Tassel Career Development Chair
2007-2010, discretionary funds.

Distinguished Alumnus (1964) Career Development Chair
2005-2007, Discretionary funds.

Fellowship support

Numerous students and postdocs in the group have benefited from fellowship support.
NSF Postdoctoral Fellowship
Jason Ernst, 2009-2012 - Full support. Title: Beyond the human genome: integrative analysis of epigenomic datasets.
Loyal Goff, 2009-2012 - Full support. Title: Small Noncoding RNA Molecules Direct Epigenetic Regulation in Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

NIH Postdoctoral Fellowship
Chris Bristow, 2009-2012 - Full support. Title: Analysis and integration of expression patterns in embryonic regulatory networks

NSF Computing Innovation Fellowship
Sushmita Roy, 2009-2011 - Full support. Title: Evolution of regulatory networks.

NSF Graduate Fellowship
Angela Yen, 2011-2014 - Partial tuition and stipend support.
Ben Holmes, 2011-2014 - Partial tuition and stipend support.
Jessica Wu, 2008-2011 - Partial tuition and stipend support.
Pouya Kheradpour, 2005-2008 - Partial tuition and stipend support.
Rachel Sealfon, 2010-2013 - Partial tuition and stipend support.

National Defense Science and Engineering (NDSEG) Graduate Fellowship
Rachel Sealfon, 2010-2013 - Full tuition and support.

Siebel Graduate Fellow
Angela Yen, 2010-2011 - Full tuition and support.

Miltos Kambourides Graduate Fellowship
Jessica Yi-Chieh Wu, 2011-2012 - Full tuition and support.

William H. Chao Fellowship
Michael F. Lin, Spring 2006, Full support.
Pouya Kheradpour, Fall 2006 and Spring 2007, Partial tuition and stipend support.

Human Frontiers Science Program
Alexander Stark, Full support, Nov 2006-Nov 2009.

Erwin Schroedinger fellowship
Stefan Washietl, Long noncoding RNAs in eukaryotic genomes (J 2966-B12), 2010-2012.

Swiss National Science Foundation Fellowship
Daniel Marbach, 2009-2010.

EMBO postdoctoral fellowship
Alexander Stark, Full support, Jan-Feb 2006.

EMBO short-term graduate fellowship
Wouter Meulman, Full support, Summer 2010.

Schering fellowship
Alexander Stark, Full support, March-Oct 2006.

Paris Kanellakis Fellowship
Georgios Papachristoudis, Fall 2007 and Spring 2008.

NIH Training Grant
Matt Rasmussen, 2004-2007, partial support.

Portugal Fellowship
Rogerio Candeias, 2007-2010, full support.


Startup funds

We have also received generous discretionary funds from the following institutions:
EECS Department
Funding for 4 student years and additional discretionary funds.

Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard
Discretionary funds.

Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab
Discretionary funds.